A Change of Plans…

I think I need to make some apologies, here. The planned “Ravencon Panels (I didn’t do)” series just isn’t materializing. Between blog outages, a hack, my mother falling ill (she’s okay; we think it was an attack of a chronic condition she’s had to deal with, before), and more, I’ve really gotten out of the habit of writing blog posts at all.

Worse, I just don’t seem to have the “free” time to write on this blog any more.  Or rather, I have fewer long stretches of time to work on the blog (without eating into my novel-writing time, that is; when I started this blog I decided right away that I wasn’t going to take time that I could otherwise use to write my novels to keep it up).

So I’m just going to discontinue the involved work needed for the Ravencon panels series, at least for now (I may cover the same topics from those panels in other posts, mind you, but not for some time, and not under that title) and move on to less intensive posts.  At the very least, I can’t keep postponing my Weekly Sunday Blog Posts without warning as much as I have.  I’m hoping to gear up the hype for my next novel, soon, and letting my blog sit around, dead, won’t help with that.

So… I’ve got no idea what my blog will feature next weekend, but I’m really hoping I at least get SOMETHING out.

Ravencon Panels (I DIDN’T do): Independent Publishing

I’ve had to re-write this intro three times, now.  At one point, this was supposed to cover two topics.  That changed once I learned this website had been hacked.  Now, I’m only covering one, and I’m probably cutting it short because I want to get this post out there (it really feels jinxed, in a way).

The two panels I’d hoped to be on, for Day One of the convention, were the “Independent Publishing” and the “Worldbuilding: Crafting New Worlds” panels. Go back through the past posts on this blog and you’ll find a lot of discussion on both topics (see here and here, respectively, for a couple examples, but I talk about aspects of both topics in numerous posts). That said, the world of indie publishing is always changing, and worldbuilding is a massive topic (we’re talking building whole WORLDS here… eh, so I’ve used that joke before, so what?).

To start with, on Indie Publishing:

Much of the discussion at this year’s (2018) Ravencon was not on self-publishing, as I had expected, but rather was about working with Small Press publishers.

Now, I’m almost entirely self-published (I’d say entirely, but there is that one story I did for that one anthology, and I did just have the audiobook for The Merrimack Event published through Tantor, so I can no longer say I’m wholly self-published), but I’ve been learning about the small press industry since I was ten years old, when my father was still alive and co-writing translations of Croatian Poetry.  And I continue researching it, keeping my ears open on all aspects of the publishing industry (Big 5, Mid-sized indie, small press indie, self-publishing, hybrid, vanity, etc.). So, I know a few things about it, even if my personal experience is limited.

For example, a number of successful self-publishers (or authors with even more experience) are turning their self-publishing enterprises into small press ventures.  I know of several (and I have worked with one):  Martin Wilsey, Chris Kennedy, and fellow Ravencon guest John Hartness (who was on the Indie Publishing panel).  Kevin J. Anderson (who you might be familiar with for his Star Wars novels, or for his contributions to the Dune series, but many of his 120+ novels were for original series or stand-alone novels) started a self-publishing company called “Wordfire Press” to re-release some of his out-of-print and backlisted titles; he now has a stable of over a hundred authors listed as having books released under that imprint.

IN GENERAL (some time in the next week a news story will come out with a counter example, I’m sure, but I’m not aware of one now), this latest crop of self-publishers-turned-publishers are treating authors far better than the Big Five do.  Better royalties, clearer language contracts, and none of the career-killing non-compete clauses, as some examples.

But small press is (and has always been) a mixed bag.  A small press publisher might treat its authors well, and appear successful, but could go out of business overnight.  This latest crop seems to be doing well (and I’m hoping for the best for all of them), but many of them are going into business without any other prior business or publishing experience.  This can be good (they may not have picked up on the bad habits of the industry) or bad (they may have no head for business and could easily go bankrupt, taking your books with them).  So, if you go that route you need to protect yourself.  That comes down to the contract you sign, but fortunately most indies are quite willing to negotiate.  And if you want advice on contracts, well, I am hardly an expert, but there are other bloggers who are.

Also, while not as prevalent as they were before, there still are shady vanity presses masquerading as small presses that prey on inexperienced and under-educated writers.  Before going into business with ANY publisher, big, small, or somewhere in between, educate yourself on good business practices from multiple sources, first.

There was also one author on this panel presenting the “hybrid publisher” model.  At least, I think the link’s description was what they were referring to (hybrid publishing has other meanings, too).  I will be honest — I don’t get the difference between the type of hybrid publishing described and the vanity press model (save, perhaps, the hybrid publishing model doesn’t always take all comers, and their services may be slightly better for the buck), and nothing that was said on this panel changed my mind on that, but this was just a fifty-minute panel.  While the author in question claimed to have success using their hybrid publisher, she did not go into details about what that meant, or how her hybrid publisher operated.

And  while this is a short-for-me post (especially after such a long wait), I think I’ll leave it here for now.  I will likely revisit this topic later (this has all been discussed before, and it will all be discussed again), but I managed to find a couple things I haven’t discussed (at least, not with these details) before.  Next post will be on Worldbuilding  (which originally was going to be combined with this post for one large “Friday panels” blog post, but after the hacking incident and other delays I just want to get something out there).  Expect another short post, but who knows?  Building worlds is a huge topic, after all.

Administrative Notes:

I know this blog has been quiet for the last few weeks, as far as its readers are concerned. It hasn’t been quiet here, behind the scenes, however.  I have a whole series of blog posts to write related to Ravencon (and its panels).  I’ve been looking forward to working on it, and went on to my blog a few weeks ago to start writing.

I instead had to scramble to fix the damage of someone hacking into my website. So, if you got a “this website may have been hacked” warning from Google or elsewhere… I’ve done what I can, and the problem should be fixed (at least nothing popped up in the scans), assuming nothing gets through between when I write this post and when I post it. I’ve been trying to fix it, myself, but since my tech team (me) is part time and under-educated for this sort of thing, it took me a while to take care of things.  I’d replace me, but it’s not in my budget to hire someone else.

Since the repairs have been completed, however, I’ve been trying to figure out how to prevent this from happening again without reducing functionality or spending way more money than I can afford.

Curiously, I only found out about the hack not because of a warning from my security software, but because Google had detected I was using an “outdated” version of vbulletin’s forum software. Since I’d deleted any forum software from this website years ago (and before it was deleted, that forum software wasn’t vbulletin), I knew something was wrong.

The hack appears unrelated to the problem from earlier this year that took this site down for a month, but it’s still troubling on that issue’s heels. Both problems seem related to plug-ins; one was a bit of old code that confused my security software, the other was a security hole in a different plug-in that a bot was able to use to hack into my website.

That hole that may have since been patched, but now I’m going through my old widgets, plug ins, etc, and deleting some old stuff that hasn’t had any updates for a while and may be vulnerable.  Much of it is stuff no-one out here will notice, but there are a few things you might see if you go digging deep in my blog’s archives.  The old polling plug-in that never worked right is now gone (which may mean the three year old posts that had been using that plug-in won’t display correctly, any more; I don’t think that’s a reason to keep the plug-in, however). I’ve also removed some broken links from previous blog entries that were detected during the clean-up process.

The next step will be to clean up and re-purpose the “Convention Calendar.”  At one point in time, I was hoping to use that plug-in to create a resource that could help SF\F writers and fans find writer-friendly conventions… but no-one ever seemed interested, the conventions themselves rarely cared when I e-mailed them to ask for a missing piece of information, and it took a lot of work, so I haven’t bothered updating it in ages.

Clearing out the calendar’s archives (which apparently attract harmful bots) will kill that plan for good.  I still think I can use the plug-in, however.  We’ll see.  After that, I may think about changing the “theme” for this blog; the current theme is one of the WordPress default themes, and is regularly patched by them (which, in theory, suggests they’re on top of plugging any security vulnerabilities), but it’s an older one, and apparently that might increase the potential for there to be exploits.  If anyone has any suggestions, please let me know.

Oh, and in unrelated (but still largely administrative) news, I finally made some minor updates to the Fennec Fox Press website.  Nothing major (most importantly, I added This Book Cannot Make Any Money to the “My Books” page, as well as an audiobook link for The Merrimack Event), but in the process I went through the “Fennec Fox Press Recommends” page and updated links to reflect newer editions, and to replace items that were no longer on sale.  I didn’t add anything all that new to it, but in the process I found that a book I would recommend to any writer (indeed, most creatives), which had long been out of print, came out with a new edition.  Since I think this particular book is so important for the writer, I will highlight the newest edition of The Law (In Plain English) For Writer’s.

And that’s it.  I had a blog post ready to go last week, but I didn’t want to put it out until I was confident that all the damage had been fixed.  So, starting next week, my long-delayed series of “Ravencon Panels (I Didn’t Do), 2018 Edition” posts will begin… unless something ELSE goes wrong.  (Sheesh, this year has been hard on this blog).

Ravencon Recap

A word of warning before we begin — I am typing this post up DURING the convention, sometimes during breaks between panels that give me only a few minutes at a time to recount something. I’m going quickly, and I’m not likely to be in any shape to do much editing when the convention is over, so there (probably) be typos here.

To start with, I left for the trip to Williamsburg on Thursday, in the middle of a wind storm, with dark and ominous clouds overhead that dumped rain on me for about a third of the trip.  Traffic was horribly slow, and I never could figure out why, but I do know that if I’d been going the other way along the same stretch of road things would have been worse:  Traffic was backed up for miles following some incident that I (after searching the web) couldn’t find out about involving two limos, an expensive-looking wrecked sports car (which looked as if it may have hit one of the limos, but the limo itself didn’t look damaged), and about thirty police cars all flashing their lights.

About the time that the CD in my car stereo started switching over to the Volga Boatman’s Song, the skies started clearing up.  Odd, that — the way things work, you’d think it should have gone the other way around.  The rest of the trip to Ravencon went smoothly, though I had the nagging sense the whole time that I’d forgotten a particular bag that had all of my toiletries, food, and similar supplies in it.  (Turns out I hadn’t forgotten that bag, but it was distracting me the whole rest of the drive).

I spent the rest of Thursday prepping for my moderator duties — I actually typed out the questions I wanted to ask so I’d have them ready for the convention, as well as copying in the selection of the upcoming book I plan to read, a copy of my schedule, etc., and used Scrivener to turn them into a .mobi file, which I uploaded to my Kindle.  And then I turned in (kind of late, because that chore took me longer than I’d thought it would), confident I was ready for the rest of the convention.  (As I’m typing this on Thursday, we’ll see how well that goes)

Now, I’d scheduled the Thursday trip expecting to be on a couple Friday panels.  It only made sense — my first Ravencon I asked for five panels, I gave them a list of my five favorites, five alternates, and three reserve alternates.  I wound up on seven panels, which (once they removed redundant panels, and factoring in the impossibility of being in two places at once) was all of the panels from my list that I could have possibly done.  For Marscon, I said I wanted to do six panels, again gave a list and an alternates list, and wound up on all of the panels and alternates I could have been on — a total of nine panels and a 2 hour workshop.  So, for this Ravencon — where they set the schedule before asking authors which panels they wanted to be on — I figured I’d ask JUST for the eight panels I wanted, expecting to be named to all of them and fearing that if I gave an alternates list I’d be on the alternate panels too.  Instead, I was only put on four of those panels, and got neither of the Friday panels I’d signed up for.  So… I guess I just don’t know what to do in order to sign up for the exact number of panels I want to participate in, with no fewer panels and no extra panels.  Sigh.

That said, I did go to attend a few Friday panels in the audience.  The first was the Independent Publishing panel, featuring John G. Hartness (expect to see his name again a few times), Ashley Voris, FT Lukens, Laurel Wanrow, and John (JC) Kang.  The intended moderator was absent (traffic, apparently), so John Hartness (who arrived late, himself) took over the role.  There was a moment of humor when he initially introduced himself as “The Late John Hartness,” and then let JC Kang know that “Hey, wait — you can’t be John, I’M John!”  I suggested (from the audience) that they instead refer to themselves as Late John and Early John (which they did a time or two).  The panel itself was interesting, though nothing I hadn’t heard before.

The next panel I went to, at 6pm, was Worldbuilding: Crafting New Worlds, with Michael Thompson, Jennifer R. Povey, Mark H. Wandrey (who has grown a rather impressive beard since I saw him, last, at Marscon), and Jean Marie Ward.  It was an interesting enough panel, but I did get the impression it needed more time.  The moderator, towards the end, was cutting the other panelists off noticeably, because he was trying to preserve time, and some topics which were raised “for later” but never discussed (Jean Marie Ward, during the first question, had mentioned avoiding “White Rooming”, and said she was expecting the moderator to bring that up in a future question, so she’d talk about that later; no such future question arose).  As big of a topic as this is (seriously, you’re talking about BUILDING WORLDS, here), it might justify a longer-than-standard panel.

I’ve been to dozens of conventions, and I think I’ve been to only one opening ceremonies (though it’s hard to remember, for sure, with some of my earliest ones).  Most of the time, that’s because it seems to be the best opening in my schedule for dinner, and this Ravencon was no exception.  So, I had an unremarkable dinner (the period of time was unremarkable, mind you, not the food.  The food was pretty good, for hotel fair), and then I returned to my room.

I didn’t have anything else I wanted to attend until the Eye of Argon reading at 10pm. Well, I’d PLANNED to go to the Eye of Argon reading — I got lost in a book, lost track of time, hadn’t thought it necessary to set up an alarm, and missed the start.

Oops. And that was it for Friday.

The first panel where I was sitting on the OTHER side of the table — the “Package Your Book to Sell” panel, where I was scheduled alongside Gail Z. Martin, Kim Iverson Headlee, and Alex Matsuo, was also my first panel on Saturday, period. I tried to get there early but arrived late (I have an excuse, involving the elevator and someone putting up signs for a party, but it’s a boring story so I won’t go into it here). Even so, I didn’t think I was that late, but I still felt as if I was playing catch-up with the other panelists for the whole panel. At least I was able to make a few points, at times, and the panel was well-attended, so I think it was successful.

After that, I went to lunch in the “Ten Forward,” a light fare station (with a cash bar, though I didn’t partake) set up in a meeting room. I needed something quick and light, and it was advertised as having “light fare,” but it was a little disappointing. The food was fast, but not very good (I had a luke-warm McDonalds-level hamburger, chips, and a warm canned soda. I had been told they also had pizza, but I didn’t see any while I was there).  There was supposed to be entertainment as well as food (fitting the theme of it being 10-Forward, they were supposed to have a series of Star Trek movies playing), but instead there was just a video projector and a group of people who were trying to get it to work and failing (as the movies were supposed to have started two hours earlier and run for at least six hours, I was wondering how long they’d been working at trying to get the thing to work).  Just as well — I wouldn’t have been able to stay until the end, anyway.

But it allowed me to have lunch in a hurry, which was important as one of the panels I REALLY wanted to be on (and wasn’t) was up next: “Ignore This Advice: Writing Tips that Aren’t So Great” with Greg Smith, Darin Kennedy, Misty Massey, and Michael A. Ventrella. I generally agreed with what they said, and they talked around it a bit, but they never quite said the point I would have loved to make: That just about EVERY generalized platitude you hear on writing should be “ignored,” because most writing advice is over-generalized. It’s usually good for addressing a specific problem that SOME writers have, but should not be used for EVERY writer, and applied to some writers it will weaken their writing rather than strengthen it.

After that, I had planned to attend the “Medicine in Fantasy” panel, because I’d applied to be on it and wanted to know what they were going to talk about for my upcoming “Ravencon Panels (I WASN’T on)” set of blogs… but I happened to also want to watch the Washington Capitals playoff hockey game, which was happening at the same time. As I did not HAVE to go to that panel (I can say quite a bit on that topic for my blog without attending the panel), so I skipped it to watch the game.

I had to leave before the game was over, however, so I missed a thrilling overtime goal by Nicklas Backstrom of the Washington Capitals to win the game in sudden death overtime.  Sigh.  Instead, I went to what was supposed to be a book reading.

Except… no-one showed.  Outside of the other author, Ken Shrader, there wasn’t anyone there.  Honestly, between the hockey game and the Clue murder mystery dinner theater performance going on at the same time, I probably would have skipped my reading, too, but I was hoping SOMEONE might pop in, curious to see what was going on.

I talked with Ken for a bit, then I decided to read a bit of Detective Hummer to see if anyone would come into a more active room (plus, sitting in silence was getting to be a little creepy), saving the clip from my next Law of Swords book until I had an audience.  Once I reached the end of the first scene, however, we’d been waiting there for a half-hour with no-one stopping by, and we just gave up (without me ever reading that clip).  I packed up my books and was about to leave when a teenage girl popped into the room, asking to see one of the stuffed Fennec foxes I’d brought to the con as swag.  I had plenty, so I let her have one of them, and then finished packing up to return to my room.

So I dropped my stuff off and updated this blog post to recount the reading.  And then it was dinner time — earlier than I’d planned, because I’d not expected the reading to end that early, but what can you do?

Turned out to be a good thing.  The restaurant was heavily backed up, warning people at the door that there was a one hour wait time.  I remember such wait times at the first Ravencon I went to at this hotel, which is why I usually planned my meals around 2+ hour breaks in my schedule, but this was the first time at this year’s convention it was an issue.  The food at this hotel always seems to be either good but slow (from the restaurant), or fast but barely edible (from their other eating stations).

But having started dinner early, I had enough time to return to my room, freshen up, and pick up my swag before my next panel — the Writer WithOUT a Day Job panel, alongside Guest of Honor Chuck Wendig, John G. Hartness, and Chris A. Jackson (the absence of Gail Z. Martin, who had lost her voice earlier in the convention, turned this into a “men with beards” panel, as someone in the audience suggested).  This was a fun panel.  John Hartness was cracking jokes in answer to every question, Chris Jackson talked a bit about having not quit his day job to become a writer but instead to spend his life sailing, and all of the panelists had a laugh when, in answer to the question “What are the things you like most about being a full-time writer as opposed to one with a day job,” they said (almost in unison) “Not having to wear pants all day!” (I forget which of them said it, but one of them added something like “Pants are the work of the oppressor!”)

I did burn through all of my planned questions a little fast (partly because two of them were rendered moot through the answers given to other questions), but the audience was full of follow-up questions, and I wish we’d had more time to answer them all.  I did give away another of my foxes after this panel (to one of the incoming panelists, I think, though I don’t know which one) once it was over.

That was pretty much it for Saturday.  Sunday was actually a little busier for me, however, at least at the start of the day.  To begin with, I overslept — I accidentally set my alarm for PM, not AM, and so… oops.  I didn’t miss my first panel of the day, but I also didn’t manage to fit in breakfast, either.

The first panel was “Promoting Yourself as a Writer” with John G. Hartness (moderating), Samantha Bryant, and Shawnee Small.  I was a bit flustered, having gotten up so late, and forgot my nameplate — not a good thing for a panel on self-promotion — but I had several of my books for display, my cards, and my foxes.  I started the panel by giving away yet another of those little guys, which may have been a SUCCESSFUL bit of self-promotion as it encouraged several people to come up and grab some of my post cards when the panel was over.

I found that the Hotel restaurant was still serving breakfast after the panel was over, and so in the end I did manage a late breakfast (even though I told the panel audience I was heading out to lunch).  And then back to my hotel room, to find my missing nameplate and swap around some of my display items.

After that was my final panel for the convention, “Self-Publishing on a Budget” with John G. Hartness and Michael G. Williams (who, in addition to self-publishing, writes books for Hartness’s Falstaff Books imprint.  Like some other veteran self-published authors I’ve met, such as Chris Kennedy and Martin Wilsey, Hartness’s self-publishing outfit has turned into a small press in its own right.  I’m still a few years away from that, even if I decide to go in that direction).

A fourth panelist (who I had never met, before, and who wasn’t listed as having any other panels at the convention, and whose name I couldn’t remember) no-showed, but the three of us handled the panel well enough without them.  John G. Hartness goes to dozens of conventions each year, and has a theater background, so he really knew how to play the crowd (which was true of all the panels we shared, but with fewer panelists it really showed here).  The only disadvantage to having so few panelists, though, was a lack of diverse viewpoints; I would have liked a different answer to “How do you go about setting a budget?” than “Well, I don’t set one,” but it was a valid answer to the question; I just think with more panelists we might have gotten some different answers.  It was pretty close to the last panel of the convention, however, so just having panelists with enough energy to keep the people in the audience entertained was a good thing.

And that was it for me.  I might have gone to the Dead Dog Dinner (a post-convention dinner gathering of guests and con staff; I went last year) had I known it was happening this year (just as there was no meet-and-greet for the guests this year, I figured there was no Dead Dog Dinner when I wasn’t informed about it in the various e-mails I’d gotten from the convention), but I didn’t find out about it until I received my author packet on Friday.  By that point, however, I’d already made other plans and couldn’t reschedule.

Overall, I enjoyed myself.  I think things went relatively well, with one or two hiccups along the way.

And this time I steered clear of the calimari.

Ravencon Schedule…

Note:  This was supposed to come out yesterday.  Oops.  I blame watching a disappointing playoff hockey loss for forgetting this… and everything else I had planned for last night.  Good thing, though — when checking through to add some links plugging my fellow authors, I found a change in the schedule which I really needed to know to prepare for.

The Ravencon schedule has come out. I originally signed up for eight panels (two on Friday, four on Saturday, two on Sunday; a nice, balanced schedule), but I only got three (Edit:  When I went to check times for the schedule, I found myself returned to one of the other panels, so I’m now on four?  Maybe?  Still not on the two I MOST wanted to do, but better). And l’ve still got the reading.

But, if you’re able to come to Williamsburg (Virginia) next weekend (that soon? Yikes!), I’ll still be there, attending some of the more interesting (to me) panels, even if I’m not on them as a panelist. The panels I DID get assigned are the following:

Saturday, Noon
Package Your Book to Sell
From covers, title design and what to include in the blurb, we discuss how to get your work off the shelf and into reader’s hands. (When I first checked this listing, there were four panelists on this panel, and now there are three.  Hm…)
Other panelists (as currently scheduled):  Gail Z. Martin (Moderator), Kim Iverson Headlee

Saturday, 6pm
READING!
As I’ve been saying for the last several weeks, I’ll be reading from the next installment of my Law of Swords series, and maybe giving out some swag (IF it gets finished in time).  If there is any extra time, however, I’ll also read selections from any of my public work that you request.
I’m apparently sharing the reading room with another author, Ken Shrader.  Not sure how that’s supposed to work, but I’ll take it.

Saturday, 9pm
Writer WITHOUT A Day Job
You’re a full-time author. How do you manage? (Note:  I proposed this panel.  I know that this is NOT the write-up I included with the proposal.  This one seems a lot more… abrupt, like a placeholder description that someone forgot to include the full write-up for.  I’ll have to look up my original proposal and bring it to the convention).  As the person who proposed this panel, I volunteered to moderate it.
Other panelists (as currently scheduled):  Chuck Wendig (Guest of Honor), John G. Hartness, Chris A. Jackson, and Gail Z. Martin

Sunday, 10am
Promoting Yourself as a Writer
How to pimp your writing and promote yourself.  (Again, this panel description feels like a placeholder.  Odd)
Other panelists (as currently scheduled):  John G. Hartness (Moderator), Samantha Bryant, Shawnee Small

Sunday, 1pm
Self-Publishing on a Budget
How to get yourself published on the cheap. (Yet again, a placeholder description.  Huh.  Are ALL of them placeholder descriptions?)  After the adventure that was recounted on this blog producing “This Book Cannot Make Any Money,” signing up for this panel made a lot of sense.  When I first checked the schedule, however, I wasn’t listed on it… but now, I seem to not only be on it, but I’m its moderator.  Uh… can do? (Now I’m kind of glad I’m a day late posting; I didn’t know I’d gotten into this one, after all, until Monday).
Other panelists (as currently scheduled):  John G. Hartness, Christie Mowery, and Michael G. Williams

I’ll be there all weekend, however, on a panel or not. And, as there were five (four, now?  Maybe I’ll get put back on some of the other panels I asked for between now and then) panels I was hoping to be on but wasn’t selected for, I think I’ll have a set of “Ravencon Panels (I Didn’t Do)” blog posts that will be coming out afterwards.

These panel\posts would include: Indie Publishing (well, maybe that’s covered by my old Self-Publishing Roundtable, but I’ll try to attend the panel and see if they bring up any points I should add.  It’s a pretty broad topic, so there’s a lot that could be covered), Worldbuilding: Crafting New Worlds (as a topic, this is pretty broad; again, I’ll try to attend this panel and structure my post around what’s discussed there), Ignore This Advice:  Writing Tips that Turn Out Not to be So Great (since hearing about this panel, I’ve been scribbling down all SORTS of notes to speak about for it; I’ll see what they cover at the panel, but I’ve got a TON of things to say), and Medicine in Fantasy (WHY was I not put on this panel?  I’ve got doctor characters either already in or planned for both of my fantasy series, and I’ve been researching material and sources for this topic for YEARS!  I’ll have to really restrict myself when I write this post).

It might still be remotely possible that I could find myself on one of these other panels, if a guest cancels and they dive into the alternates, but I will still write up a post on the topic in that case.  (It’ll just be added to the “Ravencon Panels (I DID do)” series, instead).

I may or may not post next weekend.  It depends on how the convention goes, and if I do write a post it will most likely be a recap of the convention.

Hope to see some of you there!

Cover Reveal: Law of Swords, Book III

Whether the next book in the Law of Swords series is called “In Division Imperiled,” “In Division Deceived,” or something else entirely, it now has a cover that you can see below.

But before we get to that, a little follow-up on last week.  The Merrimack Event’s audiobook was released last Tuesday, so let’s talk a bit about that.

To begin with… I like what I’ve heard of it (I’m only part-way through it, myself). I think the narrator, Troy Duran, has done an excellent job, and I haven’t heard any audio glitches or quality control issues. So far, so good. If the whole book is this good, I’m really hoping he’ll read for other books of mine, some day.

I can’t say how well it’s doing, sales-wise. I can keep track of my sales rank on Amazon, but unlike with my eBook sales or my print book sales I have no idea how that translates over into actual sales — this is my first experience with audiobooks, and I have no reference to determine what having my audiobook in the top-500 on Audiobook\ScienceFiction\Adventure on Amazon (as it has been since release, peaking as high as 160, that I’ve noticed) should roughly equate to in terms of average sales per day. In print and eBooks, even without the nice charts and graphs and actual numbers Amazon’s KDP program provides, I can guess roughly how well my book is selling based on its rank, but not with audiobooks.

The audiobook release does help in other ways, however, whatever the sales ranks say about how it’s doing. For example, I noticed a slight spike in Kindle Unlimited page reads on release day (though not in eBook sales) (Well, that was true when I wrote it a couple days ago, but I’ve had a small boost in sales, today, as well — not sure if it’s related or not). Also, in a technical sense, this means I can now say my audiobook is available in libraries all across the country (through the Hoopla app, which many libraries — including my own local library — subscribe to). And, as Tantor is a major audiobook publisher, it adds a touch of validation for me as an author for those people who continue to believe that exclusively self-published authors are mere amateurs, regardless of how much success they’ve had in sales.

But I don’t know what the audiobook sales are really like, yet. I’m hoping that they are good enough that someone (maybe even Tantor) will offer to buy the audiobook rights to my other books, even those who’ve been out long enough that they no longer stand out. If you want to see my other books as audiobooks, please, PLEASE buy a copy.

But now that that’s out of the way, on to what you’re (probably) here to see: The cover of Law of Swords Book III, as drawn by Hans “Hanzo” Steinbach.

Now I just need to finish writing the book, finalize the title, and get it edited.  To meet my goals for this year, I’ll need to get the first two of those done by Ravencon, which I leave for on the 19th, so I can get started on the next Shieldclads book early enough to get that book out this year as well.  No pressure…

(*PANIC!*)

Audiobook Now Available for Pre-Order!

My original plan for this weeks blog included the cover reveal for the next Law of Swords book, perhaps have that concluding blog for This Book Cannot Make Any Money (though I’m leaning, now, towards just leaving things as they are), and if I’d gotten my schedule for Ravencon, maybe I’d start going through that (still haven’t gotten it, yet, though.  I have no idea whether I got any or all of the panels I signed up for or not).

But I’d forgotten that today was April Fools day, and anything I did on those subjects would probably be regarded as an April Fools prank.

But there is one thing I could talk about which I can prove isn’t an April Fools Prank (and which is so simple, why would it be a prank?):  The audiobook for The Merrimack Event goes on sale, live, this Tuesday (as I mentioned last week).  I’ve been giving you the Tantor link, so far, but now a pre-order link has appeared on Amazon.  Yes, Tantor distributes to the more popular audiobook channels such as Audible, too (and to iTunes, Hoopla, and many other audiobook channels I don’t keep an eye on).

I’d say more, but again — anything else I said might be regarded as an April Fools prank, so… um, next week, I’ll be doing at least some of the things I planned for this week?

Some Catching Up to Do…

Several things have been happening these past few weeks that the blog was down, all of which would normally deserve their own blog entries. With several things coming up in the next month or so, however, I can’t afford to give them all separate blog entries (though I’ll try). So I’ve got to compress all of these items into one blog post just to catch up.

To begin with, This Book Cannot Make Any Money was released in eBook form, as expected (and the print edition was revised). It’s $2.99 (it IS a full-sized book, albeit tiny compared to my normal books), but it is free with Kindle Unlimited.  Reviews would be appreciated!

I may still write the originally planned full blog entry about the process of releasing it, as I mentioned in my last blog, but that won’t be until next week at the earliest. Or I may decide that I’ve done enough on this blog series and be done with it, because I’ve got a lot of other things I hope to cover over these next few weeks.

Second:  Back in November, recalling how long he needed to complete cover art in the past, I contacted Alex Kolesar to see if he could start the cover for the next Law of Swords book, hoping to get it by Ravencon in April.  However, he was unavailable… and, worse, he would no longer be taking on freelance work of any kind.  So… I needed to hunt down another artist.  And it couldn’t be just any artist, but one whose style was similar enough that I wouldn’t have to re-do the first to covers to match.

Found one.

The new artist is Hans “Hanzo” Steinbach, a freelancer currently working with Udon Entertainment.  Some of his past credentials include concept art for big-name video games such as NieR: Automata, costume designs for Capcom’s Street Fighter 4, and general concept art, character design, and illustration work for Tokyopop, Emerald City Games, and Boom! Studios.

And while I’d given up hope of getting that cover by mid-April, I’ve already received and approved his artwork; he works fast.  Again, showing off that artwork deserves its own blog.  I may wait to debut it at Ravencon, next month; we’ll see.  (I’ll note that I still only have a working title for Law of Swords Book 3, so even then it may not be finalized).

Third:  I have a release date for The Merrimack Event‘s audiobook:  April 3rd.  Tantor has even put up a sample of the reading, which you can now listen to from their website.  You might want to go listen.

I will note that, while they have the cover art I bought from Joel C. Payne showing, the final version of the Audiobook will have a different cover on it (this is necessary:  The standard size of an audiobook cover is VERY different from an eBook\Print cover, so it would still have needed to be re-done by someone; Tantor will want to work with someone from their regular bullpen of artists to get that done, so it’ll be done by someone else).  I’ve seen a mock-up of the new audiobook cover; thematically, it looks very similar, but the ships are different, the colors are different, the fonts will probably be different, and it looks like they want to show the same scene as the current book cover, but from a different angle.

Finally, I know I’ve mentioned this before, but I’ll be at Ravencon, which runs from April 20-22nd.  I’ll be giving a reading from the upcoming Law of Swords book, showing off the new cover, and dispensing what passes for my wisdom from several panels (how many?  I don’t know yet.  I haven’t received my schedule.  I signed up to do eight panels, but we’ll see how many I get).  Once I get my schedule, I’ll be doing (as I did last year) a few “Ravencon Panels (I’m not on)” posts, as well as a few “Ravencon Panels (I did do)” posts after the convention.

I THINK that’s it, but it’s been more than a month since my last real post, and a LOT has been happening.  If I remember something else that happened, I’ll be sure to let you all know.

Until next time!

Blog Fixed!

A Quick administrative note:

As some people probably noticed (in fact, even one Amazon review mentioned it), this blog experienced a few weeks of downtime.  I tried fixing it myself, but was unsuccessful.  It just so happened that it went down at the same time I was also dealing with oral surgery, trying to help babysit my nephew, and several other tasks that prevented me from being able to spend several hours contacting technical support until now.

However, the problem is fixed, and I now know how to fix it if the same problem occurs again.  Plus, I was able to convince my web host’s tech support to allow me to upgrade my PHP version from the same one that was in use when I first set up Maelgyn.com (more than a decade ago) to one that is still supported by somebody, somewhere, so this may help future-proof this blog from other incidents.

As many things have happened during the period this blog was non-functional, expect lots of announcements this Sunday.

This Book Cannot Make Any Money: Ebook Editions…

Normally, I try to get the eBook out first. With “This Book Cannot Make Any Money,” however, the print edition had a deadline (Marscon) but the eBook edition didn’t, and so I never even started an eBook edition until after the print version was complete. In fact, as I start the eBook version, the ONLY editable file with the final version of the completed book is the one I built in Scribus to produce the PDF. And Scribus can’t compile ePubs (yet; it’s on their ‘to do’ list, according to some of the things I’ve seen in their forums).

So I’m going to use Sigil to build the eBook with. Now, Sigil is most useful for editing pre-existing ePubs, such as those produced by Scrivener or InDesign. It is CAPABLE of producing ePubs from scratch, however… and that’s what I’m going to have to do here… yet as I’m writing this, I have no idea how to begin.

Fortunately, there are several tutorials out there — available both in written format and in video format — which will certainly help.  The problem is, every tutorial I’ve found has had completely different, and frequently incompatible, methods for how to get things done, and yet none of them are telling me everything I need to know.

Even with Sigil, I need to learn a bit of how to code in Cascading Style Sheets to get everything done I want to do.  I’ve never worked with CSS before, however, and I started building this eBook not knowing anything about how to code CSS.

A few days later, and I still know ALMOST nothing about coding CSS, and the process I eventually settled on was tedious and occasionally frustrating, but I’ve figured out enough to put that darned eBook together.

Now, it’s taken me a bit longer than I’d hoped to actually put the book together, but it only took me one day of, quite frankly, fumbling around blindly, guided only by mismatched tutorials, to learn what I needed to get started.  It’s a bit daunting, but it’s doable, and it doesn’t take THAT long to learn the basics.

So, is it practical for someone, with zero previous experience and zero budget, to learn how to make their own eBook?  Well, I’d say “yes,” but then again people have been eating Tide Pods lately, so… yeah.  I would say that it is doable for MOST people, however, if they’re willing to spend a day or two mucking about trying to figure things out.  You don’t need to learn all there is to know about coding .css, you don’t need to know everything about book design, etc., you just need to know enough to get YOUR book ready.

When the eBook is done, I’ll test it on my Kindle (as well as on other devices and through whatever .mobi reading software is available that I can find) before uploading.  I suppose that will be cheating, a bit (if I’m not allowing myself to use things like Microsoft Word for this challenge, I shouldn’t let myself use things like my Kindle, either), but the idea at that stage is to see the eBook across as many devices and platforms as you have access to.

But I’m not at that stage, yet.  I’m about half-way through the eBook conversion process… so I guess there’ll be one more blog on this topic, after all.  Next week (hopefully), the book will be done, and I’ll discuss setting up and uploading a book to Amazon.