Category Archives: Writing Software

Inspiration for the OTHER Parts of Writing….

I wasn’t entirely sure what to write for a blog this week. Most of the things I could think of were too involved to complete in a week, and doing yet another status report (I’m still working on the next book. I hope to have the next installment of the Law of Swords series sent off to the editor by August (I better; he has an unexpected opening in his schedule, and if I get it to him by then I may not have to find another editor for this series, after all), which should allow for it to be published by year’s end, and for me to move on to the second Shieldclads book) when I had no real news felt a little boring.

Fortunately, I was saved from having to either skip this week or do just that when a certain crowdfunding project popped up in my newsfeed and inspired this post. It is an effort, by one of the original creators, to produce the sequel to one of my favorite computer game series… from the 1980s: Starflight (well, technically, Starflight 2 was the only one I played back then). The campaign is not fully launched, yet (they’re trying to get a handle on how much funding they need), but it’s looking like a direct sequel to the originals. I haven’t had time to play an involved computer game in quite some time, however — it’s been months, I think, since I even opened a game significantly more complex than the “Reversi Free” game on my cell phone.  Despite that, I did make a small pledge to support the game, already.  The earliest it will be out is 2020 (and if they actually make that deadline, I’ll be shocked; I’ve never known a crowd-funded computer game that was delivered on time), so maybe I’ll be able to fit it into my schedule by then.

I loved those games. Some of my other favorite games from that era were the Ancient Art of War (and its sequel, the Ancient Art of War at Sea), Sid Meier’s Pirates!, Red Storm Rising (also by Sid Meier, curiously enough, but based on the Tom Clancy novel), and (squeaking in at the end of that era) the Wing Commander series.*

One thing all these games had in common: Absolutely fantastic, well-designed, well-illustrated, and heavily lore-filled… manuals (sometimes not just manuals; some games came with other material that just added to the fun of getting a boxed game edition.  Nowadays, it seems every game manual you get, even with a boxed game, is little more than what the quick start guide was back then). In the days before every lore-rich game has its own fan-compiled Wiki and computer games had their own novel series written for them (and sometimes even after they started getting their own books), the game manual would often be the definitive source of canon for the lore.

The Ancient Art of War included a complex discussion of strategy and tactics (and the differences between the two, and it included an abridged version of Sun Tzu’s original text). It’s sequel had textbook-level discussions of many of the greatest naval battles in the history of the age of sail. Sid Meier’s Pirates! had bits of humor, a discussion of the different types of ships and arms and bits of history from the era of the early colonization of the Caribbean. It explained why they programmed the ships in the game to react to wind the way they do, and they made it FUN. I learned more about the history of fighting sail from those game manuals than I EVER did in school (and later would read quite a bit more, and learned that while there were some inaccuracies, these manuals were closer to the scholarly accepted truth of these events than any account I could find in my high-school era or earlier texts, including some produced by the US Navy for JROTC). They weren’t novels, nor were they textbooks, nor were they scholarly texts. I’d hesitate to say they were even manuals (at least, compared to what most people think of when they hear the words “software manual”). But they were brilliant examples of writing. I’ve saved a couple of them until today… (I would have saved all of them, but I think the Pirates! manual fell apart from over-use).

I’d say the same was true of the Starflight manuals, and the Wing Commander manuals. These were fun, small texts, again filled with lore, and were excellent examples of worldbuilding.  The Starflight manuals opened with briefing notes on the state of the universe, before discussing the game functions in a less “in-character” way.  (Just curious — does anybody know a term for the inverse of ‘breaking the fourth wall,’ where you’re writing a non-fiction account of a fictional matter, then switch “in character” to the fiction for a moment?  Because these manuals did just that, once or twice).  They would describe the mechanics of the game, give touches of gameplay advice, and intersperse all of that with snippets of fictional “transmissions” and “captains logs” and the like, which were meant to give you clues on how to solve various puzzles throughout the game.  Then it would have an appendix with charts, illustrations, etc. regarding the materials that could be collected in game.

The Wing Commander series manuals (and, curiously, the Red Storm Rising manual) started out in similar fashion (If I recall correctly; I was able to find a copy of the original Starflight manuals online to verify my recollections, but I couldn’t with these).  Their appendices instead were more like “Janes Fighting Ships” entries, detailing the various fighters, capital ships, and equipment you could encounter throughout the game.

I won’t say these sorts of game manuals have gone away completely (I don’t buy NEARLY enough games, nowadays, to say anything of the sort; I do know the 2004 Pirates! remake had a similar style manual, but I’m coming to believe that was a rare exception), but I think a lot of what used to be in the manuals aren’t there any more.  The material’s still around, but its been moved inside the game itself, like the “books” your create-a-character can read in the Elder Scrolls games.  In some ways, this allows for even more of these worldbuilding bits to be included in the lore.  You can’t curl up in bed with them like you can a book (or a Kindle), though (don’t be pedantic and mention laptops; yes, technically, that can work, but laptops generally aren’t that good for gaming, and are harder to “curl up” with than a book).

Again, I’ve tried to keep these books around, but I think I was a bit less successful here — the Starflight 2 manual was once dropped in a bathtub (don’t ask), and I haven’t found the game manuals from the Wing Commander series since my last move.  While I had them, though, they were fun reading — sometimes, even after I stopped playing the games, I would pull them out, curl up in bed, and read these manuals just for nostalgic fun.

So what is the point of all this?  Well, as much as I was waxing nostalgic, it isn’t just to lament the long-forgotten art of computer game manuals.  It’s to talk about applying writing lessons from unexpected sources.  In this case, those old computer game manuals proved to be an excellent model of worldbuilding, for me.

Were I to do a touch of editing (and some additional reconstruction; a portion of them were lost in one of the incidents that delayed The Merrimack Event’s release, and while I reconstructed the important bits I did that a little haphazardly), the notes I wrote up for my own use in the Rink of War universe would greatly resemble the Wing Commander\Red Storm Rising\etc.-style appendices.  My outlines will sometimes include little diary entries\captains logs like you find in the Starflight manuals — things which likely won’t ever make it into the books, themselves, but which help me figure out what the characters are thinking.

You often hear people say “Inspiration comes in many forms” when it comes to story ideas, and writers often take experiences from real life to plot their books around. I’ve come up with childrens book ideas (which I’m not sure I’ll ever have time to write) just by watching the birds at our birdfeeder, myself.  I don’t think most writers think to apply the same thought process to other aspects of their writing careers, however.  When veteran book designers are giving advice to amateurs, they often say to “look at books you like” as examples to base their books around, but there are a lot of self-publishers who still have no idea how to go about formatting their books.  So how many writers would think to apply the lessons learned from game manuals from the 1980s when it comes to writing up notes for their books?

Just a thought.

*- I’d also like to mention the Sierra Classic games, which are also favorites of mine from that era and also contain lots of good examples of good worldbuilding and complex lore. Most of the best examples of the writing of those games were IN the games, not the manuals, however. Oh, and while I’m at it, I might as well mention “Where in Time is Carmen Sandiego,” which I think was the last game I bought for my old Commodore 64; I didn’t play that game for very long (I switched over to a PC not long after), but it came with a copy of a (real, unadulterated for the game) desk encyclopedia I still have and may occasionally still use now and then.

Moving on to other things…

Note:  This post was ready to go last night, but I (to be blunt) forgot to post it.  Oops!  Still getting back into the blogging habit.

After last week’s post, you must be wondering what I’m going to talk about here. (Well, maybe not, but _I_ sure was wondering what I’d be doing for this blog this week). I’m certainly not going to talk politics, or wade in on whatever the latest outrage is in the publishing industry. (I do think there have been some less controversial newsworthy stories in the publishing industry over the past couple months, but I don’t think I’d cover the one that comes to mind the most better than the articles I learned the story from)  However, this week an offer came to my attention that actually gives me something to talk about.

For years, I’ve used Adobe InDesign CS6 to build my print books with. InDesign is professional-grade design software used for the creation of PDF files that meet the best standards of most printers and print shops.  It is possible to create professional-looking print book without such software, but this kind of software provides specialty tools that can improve on that.

CS6 was the last non-cloud version of their software, which is the “industry standard” for book design, but it’s now several versions out-of-date, and the only updates for it require paying a monthly subscription fee.  I far, FAR prefer paying one-time fees, I hate working on the Cloud (especially when it comes to software I am likely to use when I’m away from home and internet access is uncertain), and Adobe software and for as long as I typically use this kind of software, paying that subscription fee can be more expensive in the long run.

CS6 isn’t very instinctive to use, however, and can be difficult to work with.  From what I’ve seen of it, the cloud-based updates are just as difficult to manage and more (because they need to add in the new features, many of which I’d never use).  It also is showing signs of age; most of Adobe’s technical support for the product ended in 2014, and even the last bits of legacy support for the product ended in May of 2017.  Worse, while I am still using Windows 7, I understand that CS6 is only partially compatible with Windows 10, so if I ever upgrade my operating system it will probably break my InDesign.

This has had me thinking about alternatives for a while, now.  Much like Coke has major competitors in Pepsi (and smaller competitors in Royal Crown, Hansen’s, and other smaller soda companies), InDesign does have a couple major Industry-accepted competitors:  Scribus (a freeware program I tried out for one project; it works, but the six year old version of InDesign I use felt more modern), Microsoft Publisher (sometimes bundled with Office; it’s considered something of an entry-level version of the software, and I believe more recent versions are also cloud-based subscription model-only software), and QuarkXPress.

QuarkXPress is the big one.  Back when I was studying computer-aided design in college (this was more years ago than I care to admit), QuarkXPress WAS the industry standard, and while InDesign was gaining ground it was still number two.  The courses I took in college were centered around… whichever version of QuarkXPress was the latest at the time (or Microsoft Publisher, depending on which class and which year).  It was only when InDesign was bundled with Photoshop in the “Creative Suite” (2003…ish) that InDesign overtook them.  At least, from what I remember of them both in 2003, when I last had access to the latest versions of each piece of software, QuarkXPress was a far more intuitive design.  Since then, QuarkXPress has been a bit under-the-radar (and arguably they had a few years where their updates underperformed the competition, though I understand they’ve turned things around and have been producing an excellent product, again, for the last five years), but they still have a good product, and they are continuing to update it without tethering you to some cloud-based monthly rate model.

And I recently learned that QuarkXPress is offering a significant sale to anyone using one of their competitors’ products, and I think that’s too good an offer to pass up.  I’ll still have InDesign CS6 around (at least until I switch computers) in case I want to update the old files, but I will be doing most of my work, going forward, using QuarkXPress.

So, when I get ready to prepare the print version of my next Law of Swords book (which is 90% written, based on word count estimates; I couldn’t possibly say based on outline, as I’ve thrown out the outline on this book, but that seems about right story-wise as well), it will be my first using the new software.  I’ll let you know what I think of the experience as it happens.

This Book Cannot Possibly Make Any Money — Getting Started: Software

As was in my “Future Plans” post, I’m currently working on three writing projects simultaneously:  The third Law of Swords book, the Fennec Fox Press House Style Guide (which is typically added to only as issues come up) and — in those times when I NORMALLY work on this blog — a book entitled “This Book Cannot Make Any Money.”

Work on “This Book Cannot Make Any Money” won’t prevent this blog from being written, however.  Instead, it is intended as its own blog series, allowing me to go through the process of self-publishing a book in a tutorial form, or (since I intend to actually publish the end-product of this series) maybe more like a “lets play” (to borrow from the Gamer vernacular) of self-publishing a book for my blog readers.  This is my second try at this kind of project; the first time it got bogged down and eventually swallowed by the need to deal with other things, but this time I have a more developed plan for how to handle this.

So let’s begin.

Once you’ve completed your first draft, I recommend setting a budget based on your projected worst-case-scenario projection for sales. I should add the caveat that I mean REALISTIC (not optimistic, not pessimistic) worst-case scenario.  If you mishandle things, yes, it is possible to never sell a single copy of a book, but that’s a pessimistic projection.  From past performance, I would project the worst case scenario for any of my sci-fi\fantasy genre novels as two hundred fifty ebook sales.  At $4 profit per sale (when I set the eBook price at $5.99), that means I could set a budget of $1000 and realistically expect to break even in a worst-case scenario.

But this isn’t one of my genre novels; this is a collection of material that I’ve read, or for which I’ve been told, or which I’ve even decided for myself “Cannot Possibly Make Any Money.”  With that as the premise for this project, I (at least for purposes of this blog series) project earning… no money from this book.  So my total budget is zero dollars, of which I can spend zero dollars on software, zero dollars on the cover, zero dollars on the editing, zero dollars on the book design, and zero dollars on marketing.  Okay, that was easy!

The rest of this blog series is going to be on overcoming the obstacle of having zero budget when self-publishing; how, with no budget, I can acquire the necessary software, create an original cover, get the book edited, and (easiest of all, though you might not believe it) market that book without spending one penny.

I have, or can and have borrowed from my mother:

1.  Microsoft Office Suite 2007 (IIRC, it was bought at an extreme discount through a program my workplace at the time was offering)

2.  Adobe InDesign v.6 (received as a gift; the last non-cloud version of InDesign.  I recommend sinking the costs of any software you buy in a purchase rather than creating a recurring cost by leasing it over the cloud)

3.  Scrivener, purchased during one of their half-price sales.  (I think that, with NaNoWriMo just around the corner, that’s about to come up)

4.  Photoshop Elements v. 10 or v.15 (I may be purchasing Photoshop Elements 2018 soon; v.10 came packaged for free with other software, and v.15 is borrowed from my mother)

5.  Corel Draw (whatever the latest version is; it’s on my mothers computer)

…and probably a few other pieces of software I’ve bought for my writing business (or my mother has bought for her quilting business) that I’m not thinking of right now.

But, since we’re maintaining the rule that I have zero budget for this project, I’m going to pretend I haven’t bought ANY of this, yet, and find substitutes.

I do have to make certain concessions for the series as a whole before we begin:  I have a blog, access to the internet, etc.  My blog is on a paid-for site, but its using a resource that is free and can provide a free host if necessary (WordPress).  These things I could manage to access from my local library, but the library usually won’t allow you to install software on their computers.  They might, if they’re equipped well enough, have some similar software installed on their computers you can borrow, but you can’t count on that.

So, it is a bit of an assumption that — even with zero budget to produce your book — you own or have access to a computer on which you can access the internet and are permitted to install software.  If you don’t, well, I’m sorry, I’m not sure what to suggest.

So, with the limitations of zero budget (minus that concession), what options in the software department are there?

In place of Microsoft Office:  Anything that I would normally do with Microsoft Office, I will instead — for this project only — do with the LibreOffice suite.  Now, both Microsoft Office and LibreOffice are suites of tools, but to replace the ones I actually use for my publishing work, I only need LibreOffice Writer (for word processing, replacing Microsoft Word) and LibreOffice Base (simple database software replacing Microsoft Access.  I use Access to maintain some of my notes, such as character records, which need to be kept across books of a series; due to the nature of “This Book Cannot Possibly Make Any Money,” however, I won’t be using it for this book).  LibreOffice is available for free (it better be, or I’m already breaking the rules), and will work with Windows, Macintosh, or even Linux.  (You do need to download the correct version for your operating system, of course).

An alternative to LibreOffice is Apache OpenOffice.  LibreOffice was, in fact, originally OpenOffice, but (skipping one long, complex, boring story to explain why) they split up into two organizations developing similar suites of software from a common ancestor.  LibreOffice is generally considered to be the better option, containing much of the original design team, but some people still prefer OpenOffice

To replace InDesign I’ll choose Scribus.  Scribus is also free, open-source software designed specifically to do, well, the same things InDesign does.  It’s been going strong for many years, now, and most of the bugs are already worked out!  (A word of warning:  They recommend that you install ‘Ghostscript‘ first.  I made the mistake of not doing this the first time I installed Scribus, and it caused several problems with my initial set-up.

Outside of Scribus, the only other free software I can think of that works as a replacement for InDesign is… InDesign.  A couple years back, Adobe offered a free download of a no-longer-supported earlier version of InDesign (in fact, a whole suite of programs InDesign was part of a package of), version 2.0.  It’s a bit hard to track down, and requires a software key (they provided one for the public domain at the time) which may no longer be listed anywhere, but if you can find it you can get the entire Adobe CS software suite for free.  Because of its obscurity, however, I’ll stick with Scribus.  (Scribus has a few more modern features, anyway).  If you do have the budget to BUY this sort of software, however, I wouldn’t recommend the current, cloud-only version of InDesign; instead, I would go with QuarkXPress.  A bit expensive, but it has a lifetime license (and thus is a sunken cost).

Scrivener is an odd one.  It’s a word processor designed specifically for creating books, but the Windows version (which is the only one I have) is missing several key features available on the Mac version.  Scrivener has promised a new, updated version soon (Scrivener 3.0) which should EVENTUALLY bring them up to near identical versions, but even with that the Mac version will be the first release.

The long and the short of it is that I only use Scrivener for eBook building, after the book has been edited.  Since that’s all I use it for, I will compare it not with other word processors but rather with other eBook-making utilities.  I’m at least somewhat familiar with Sigil, so that’s what I’ll be using, but I understand Calibre is popularly thought to be more intuitive and will likely have more tutorials for its use.  Nevertheless, I’ll be using Sigil to produce an ePub, which I will then convert to .mobi for uploading to Amazon.  (Calibre can do the conversion itself; Since Sigil can’t — at least not as of the latest version I’ve downloaded — I’ll instead be using a simple tool called ePub to Mobi).

The graphics suites are all that we still need to worry about.  As a substitute for Photoshop I’ll be using the popular (though a bit tricky-to-use) GIMP.  As a substitute for Corel Draw, I’ll try Inkscape (an open-source vector-based graphics utility I first saw in a package of “best open-sourced software” back in 2009.  I’ve often installed it but never used it, so this will be a bit of an adventure).  Not sure if I’ll need both of these programs, but at least I’m set up if I do.

Okay, software is taken care of.  Next time on “This Book Cannot Possibly Make Any Money,” I’ll start using these bits of software to ‘create’ the book’s content (which is already written… or is it?).  See you then.

Self-Publishing Roundtable Addendum I

INTRODUCTION

I have been very busy working on In Forgery Divided this week (the sequel to In Treachery Forged). Because of that, I haven’t had as much time as I usually do to work on my blog. The blog I was planning for this week (Weird Research Part 5) is half-finished, but it doesn’t look as if I’ll get it done in time for my usual Sunday post.  Not because it is especially long, but because it requires I replicate some of my old research in order to complete it, and I just haven’t had time for that.

But I will not go content-less this week. I thought I might lay out some “quick-hits” addendums to my Self-Publishing Roundtable series.

#1: KINDLE PREVIEWER

I look through a lot of blogs on writing and self-publishing. Some I give more attention than others, but even some of the less-relevant to my needs blogs have useful information from time to time.

Such is the case with Aaron Shepard’s Publishing Blog.  By the time I discovered his blog, he no longer felt as if he was an “authority” on self-publishing.  With the words “The Party’s Over,” he effectively went into semi-retirement as a self-publishing guru, and a lot of his articles have been left aging and out-of-date.

He does still publish the occasional blog post, however (mostly on things like the paper quality of Createspace vs. Ingram POD books, if you’re interested), and every now and then he has new news to share.

Last week, he pointed out something I was unaware of:  That the “virtual proof” you can get for your Kindle eBooks from Amazon’s Kindle Previewer no longer resemble the final version of the ebook your readers buy.  This is apparently because of Kindle’s still-in-progress attempts to improve typographic features for their .kf8 proprietary ebook file standard.  (keep in mind that, as far as 99.999% of writers are concerned, it doesn’t matter what the file standard it.  It just matters what the book looks like in the end.  Some book designers might have issues with it, however, and sometimes as a self-publisher you need to handle both jobs).

What this means is that — at least for the moment — you should probably buy at least one copy of your own eBook after release, just to double-check and make sure things look the way you intended them do.  I suspect it won’t make a noticable change for most of you, but there’s always the chance of something going wonky.

#2:  TRENDS IN SELF-PUBLISHING BLOGGING: FONTS

There are a few issues in self-publishing which rise up on occasion.  Some of these are bred by controversy, and I tend to avoid saying much on those topics (I usually have an opinion, but I rarely feel strongly enough — or well-informed enough — to get into an argument over these topics), but there are other topics which very well might be “trend by coincidence.”

For example, I saw, over the course of two weeks, five or six articles on font selection.  I doubt this was a co-ordinated effort by this blogs, but by happenstance a trend was developing among self-publishing blogs.  So, I guess I’ll follow suit.

Keep in mind — it generally isn’t advisable to use a specific font in eBooks; you might (as I do) use something a touch fancy as a title font (the font used on your title page, chapter headers, etc.; this can be, and frequently is, identical to the font used on your front cover), but otherwise leave fonts alone for your eBooks.

If you are designing your own print books, however, you’re going to need to pay attention to your font choice.  In print, for the interior of your book, you probably want a serif font rather than a san-serif because it’s easier on the eyes (this is reversed on an electronic screen, though probably not an eInk eReader).  And you don’t want the font choice to distract your reader by being too fancy, too stylistic, or too, well…

Book designers, in particular, have issue with certain fonts such as Times New Roman because they are “boring” (or rather, because they make the interior of your book look like it was printed on your home computer on default settings).  They think these styles are so boring that they can throw the reader out of the story.  I’m not sure how much stock I put into these pronouncements, but I do agree there are fonts that look more stylized than TNR without breeching that “too fancy” line.

When picking a font for the inside of your book, you should ensure you’ve picked something that displays all of your punctuation correctly.  It can be a particular issue if you’re using a more obscure font; some fonts were designed for “Display” or for particular specific uses, and any unneeded punctuation (like, say, an apostrophe) simply was never designed for it.  And some fonts have a complete set of punctuation marks that look quite nice… until you see, for example, an em-dash placed next to a curvy letter like b, p, u, g, etc.  (I know that specific one because it is a known issue with the print edition of “In Treachery Forged.”  For some reason, the kerning — the space between letters — looks far too wide with the font I chose)

You also want to make sure you have the right to use these fonts you choose commercially.  Don’t trust that, just because you can pick it in the font selector of your computer, you can just use any old font.  Most fonts are copywritten, and some have very peculiar restrictions for their use.  I like using nice, free fonts without commercial restrictions, such as Alegreya, which can be found on Fontsquirrel.  There are some fonts that come with software, however, and you are still permitted to use some of them… but you had better check before you do.  There are some fonts that come with Microsoft Word, for example, that you are not allowed to use on commercial projects.

Beyond that, I don’t really have much advice.  Just use stuff that you think looks professional — don’t do something “fun” and use Comic Sans or a similar font in your interior because “it makes the book look handwritten.”  Maybe it does make your book look handwritten… but it also makes it hard to read, and that discourages your customers from wanting to finish your book.

Try and get it right the first time, though.  Changing a font after the proof has come out can be very daunting — if you change the font you change the font size; changing the font size means you’ll have to re-do all of those corrections you made for justification, widows and orphans, etc.; re-doing all of those corrections will change the page count; changing the page count changes the thickness of your book spine.  Basically, after a certain point, if you change the font you have to completely re-design your book.

#3: BOOKS OFFERED ON EBAY, BUT NO-ONE BOUGHT IT!

I see people in this scenario a lot:

They do a search for their own book.   Surprise, surprise, they find a copy of their print book for sale on eBay… but they have yet to sell a single print copy, so how can it possible be offered on eBay?

Well, the thing to remember is that your book is Print-on-Demand, and that many legitimate small-business book dealers use eBay as their storefront.

If your book is made available on expanded distribution, any dealer can buy the book for resale.  Some dealers will list books they don’t yet have on eBay, knowing that they can buy those books on-demand, if someone orders it from them.  It is only after someone buys the book from them that your book would be sold to them.

So, if you see your book listed on eBay even though it hasn’t been sold, no, it doesn’t mean that the seller is “ripping you off” and should be reported to eBay for fraud.  Most likely, they’re trying to sell your book for you, and you should be thanking them.

#4: FUTURE SELF-PUBLISHING ROUNDTABLE PLANS

I’m very busy with In Forgery Divided, but I have a plan to continue the Self-Publishing Roundtable once that’s out the door.

On Facebook (and in a few other spots) I’ve talked about an anthology (or rather, in this case, a compilation; the difference is the number of authors involved) entitled “This Book Cannot Make Any Money.”  It would consist of various things (poetry, experimental fiction, an inside joke, story fragments, etc.) that were too small to sell on their own, too wierd to sell on their own, too incomplete (and never-to-be-completed) to sell on their own, or some combination of the above.  In other words, it’s a compilation of a bunch of things that will never make any money (as the title says).

What I was thinking I might do (extreme emphasis on the ‘might’) is compile that book, and make a set of blogs dovetailing off of both this Self-Publishing Roundtable Series and my still-to-be-debuted Writing Software Review Series.  I would blog the entire process of going from “I’m done writing; time to find an editor” to “Ebook and Print Book Both Published, Copywritten, and the First Month of ‘Marketing’ Complete” completing this project with zero budget and in my “off hours.”

The idea would be I’d walk people through the process.  I would also try building the same book multiple times (using different software; I’d build the eBook once with Scriveners, once with Sigil, maybe even once with Jutoh or similar paid-for software (again, if you want me to buy Jutoh to review it, I need AT LEAST ONE COMMENT asking about it).  Then I’ll build the print book in Adobe InDesign (CS6), Microsoft Publisher (2007), and Scribus (1.4.5).  Then I’d walk through the process of setting prices, assigning ISBNs, and publishing through Amazon, Nook, Smashwords, Kobo, Draft2Digital, Apple, various niche stores, etc.

Again, this is a very tentative plan.  It will go very, very slowly, because I’ll be trying to manage it around the writing, publishing, and marketing work I’m doing that I hope can make some money.

CONCLUSION

Well, this is the first “unplanned” update for the Self-Publishing Review.  There’ll probably be others in addition to item #4, above… but not for a while.  Expect another Weird Research post next week.

 

Edit:  Comments on this post have been disabled because of spammers; contact me if you’re a real person and want me to re-open comments.

Software Reviews Series (0/?)

I mentioned this in my last post, but didn’t explain.  A problem with Windows 10 had me downgrading to Windows 7; unfortunately, that downgrade didn’t work right, and I wound up having to wipe out my C drive and reinstall all my software) ate most of the time I had to work on my blog this week.  It did, however, remind me of another series I was considering:  Reviewing “Software for the Author.”  It was never my intention to only run one series at a time, especially as open-ended as the Research series is, so I figured I could introduce this new planned series even if I’m not ready to start the actual articles.

Now, DO NOT EXPECT THIS SERIES TO START NEXT WEEK.  It requires research (hm…), and I’m not prepared for it.  I’m only adding this post now because I didn’t have time to do any of the other blog posts I have planned.

Keep in mind I am not a technical expert on these pieces of software. There are things I will not, or do not know how to, test (for example, I can’t test cross-platform compatability for many of the products that claim this as a feature).  There are things that you might think are vitally important in a piece of software, but I don’t even think to look at them because (in my experience) they’ve never come up.  This is just based on my personal experiences with this software (or, at least, simulations of my normal experience, if I’m doing a comparison with something I haven’t used often).

In some cases, I will be comparing the latest version of a freeware program (such as Scribus or LibreOffice) with older versions of professional software (I intend to do a review of Adobe InDesign, but I refuse to use their latest, cloud-only offering.  I have access to Microsoft Office 2003, 2007, and — if I borrowed my mother’s computer — whatever version of Microsoft Word she got off the cloud, though not any of the other parts of the suite)

I also have no intention of testing every feature of this software.  These will just be reviews of how I use them, why I — as a writer — might choose them over various alternatives, and what I think a writer would be most interested in with them.

Now, I reiterate — don’t expect me to start this next week.  I hope to go right back to the Review Series (with something on Constructing Languages and why I’ve only made rudimentary efforts, so far) — but below you will be able to find an index for what I plan on reviewing (not necessarily in order; depends how long I have to test some of these things), below.  I’ll add  hotlinks when I start.

  1. The Hemmingway App (vs. Grammarly, perhaps?)
  2. Scrivener
  3. Sigil
  4. InDesign vs. Publisher (2003 and 2007) vs. Scribus (this one may be bumped down, folks; I’ll need to figure out something I can use as a sample to compare these with)
  5. EPub to MOBI
  6. LibreOffice (vs. OpenOffice vs AbiWord vs. WPS Office Free vs. Microsoft Office 2003 vs. Microsoft Office 2007 vs. whatever other free Office packages or word processors I can find between now and then, perhaps?  Recommendations might be nice)
  7. Jutoh, maybe? (I haven’t bought it, yet, but I will if there’s interest.  Yes, that means I need at least ONE comment, somewhere, if you want me to test this)
  8. ???