Category Archives: Law of Swords Series

Future Plans

I had hoped I would be able to say “the print edition for The Merrimack Event has been released!” by now… but I’m still waiting on a second proof copy (hopefully one without a mangled spine, this time). I do have several milestones to note: I reached over one thousand sales and one MILLION page reads (actually, it’s about one and a quarter million page reads, at last check). In less than a month.

Uh… okay, that was a little unexpected.

So, my original plan, as far as future book releases go, hadn’t factored in The Merrimack Event. As fed up with it as I was by the time it was released, I was convinced it wouldn’t sell, well, anything. I was publishing it to get it out of the way, so I could move on to my other books.  I spent more to get it out the door than my other books, so my expectations could be summed up as “I hope it will break even or something.  And it won’t be holding up my other books, any more!”

Well, it did that… and a lot more.  And now I have to figure out where to slip a (still untitled) sequel into the “to do” list.  I have a plan for a sequel… uh, somewhere (it’s been thirteen years since I last looked at it, but I do remember that I’ve preserved it across several computer moves).  Even if I can’t find that outline, however, I can come up with a new one; I’ve just got to figure out when to get it started.

The original plan was to finish In Division Imperiled (or whatever I call the 3rd book of the Law of Swords series), and then move on to By Claw and Arrow (the sequel to The Kitsune Stratagem.  I need to re-launch this book; it doesn’t seem right that my best-written book (both my opinion and by several objective standards) should also be my worst-selling book.  Getting the sequel out there would be an opportunity to do that).  After that, I was going to polish off To the Rink of War, turn it (and the unpublished serialized short sequels) and re-publish it as a novel.

I also had the idea of putting together a couple shared-world anthologies for a couple of my books, but that would have required some changes to Fennec Fox Press‘s business model (I’d be going from a sole proprietorship to a LLC, I’d have to change my accounting system so I can preserve money to pay other authors, etc.), so they were in a more nebulous “later.”  And, some day in the middle of all that, I was thinking of putting together that “This Book Can’t Make Any Money” blog project as part of a self-publishing tutorial on the side.  There were also a couple supplementary works planned that would slot in as they were ready — for example, the Fennec Fox Press House Style Guide, which is currently (in software parlance) in an Alpha version, but would need to be completed before I could even consider an anthology, and would be nice to complete before I send ANYTHING out for editing, again.

But now… all of that is out the window.  Oh, I’m still doing all of that, but now I need to slot in a sequel for The Merrimack Event.  And if I slot in a sequel for The Merrimack Event, I’ll have enough books in the list to need to account for book four of Law of Swords.  And as urgent as keeping those two series going is, maybe I’ll have to set aside those anthology plans until I’ve cleared up some other parts of my schedule.  And…

Well, anyway, I revamped my “order of production” schedule; see what you think.

  1.  In Division Imperiled (working title):
    The manuscript for this is already half-way done (or, well, I’m somewhere in the middle of it.  It’s gone pretty far off the trail set by the original outline, so I’m not sure exactly where I am in the story).
  2. The Fennec Fox Press House Style Guide
    The editor for In Division Imperiled has become overwhelmed with work, and may not be available for that book, so I might need to find another one.  If so, I’m going to need to have this ready for them.  This is a small thing, and can be worked on concurrently with In Division Imperiled.  It may wind up being completed first.  If released to the public (instead of just sent to the new editor with the manuscript), it would be a free download off the Fennec Fox Press website.
  3. By Claw and Arrow (Inari’s Children, Book 2)
    I still want to re-launch The Kitsune Stratagem, and getting this book out there is a big part of the plan for doing so.  So, while I’m anxious to get The Merrimack Event’s sequel out there, I’m still planning to get this out as quickly as possible, too.  If I start working on this and it gets bogged down, however, I’ll swap this with the next book in the queue.
  4. Shieldclads # 2
    Um, since I don’t even know where I put the outline for this, yet, I haven’t worked out a title for it.  But here is where I hope to slot it in.  Here is also where my original scheduled plan starts to diverge from the new one.
  5. This Book Cannot Make Any Money
    Another side project that can be done alongside other books (since most of the work will actually be done in the time allotted for working on this blog).  This could actually be ready any time before or after this point, but I’m guessing that I’ll have it done by this point.
  6. Law of Swords, Book # 4
    This was GOING to be The Rink of War, the novel-length version of the short story\novelette, To The Rink of War.  Instead, I have to juggle in the sequels to my more popular series, so here’s where Law of Swords 4 goes in.
  7. ONE OF:  Rink of War OR Nine Tales of the Kitsune
    Nine Tales of the Kitsune is the first of my planned Anthology projects.  IF I think I can generate the interest from other authors without too much trouble (one of the things I hope to do at my upcoming convention appearances is network with other writers), I may get this set up for this slot.  Otherwise, Rink of War (mentioned above) will be bumped here.
  8. Shieldclads #3
    Juggling two successful series is going to be difficult, especially with my other projects included.  This project and the next might wind up flipped, depending on how things work out.
  9. Law of Swords, Book # 5
    This should CONCLUDE the Law of Swords series.  I may revisit this world again, but with the series ended the schedule will be freed up for more “new” projects.
  10. Inari’s Children, Book # 3
    Current plans have this as the concluding book, but I’m not happy with the outline for this one.  If the relaunch of The Kitsune Stratagem is successful, I’ll rewrite the outline spreading the story into at least four books; otherwise, I’ll revamp it to conclude the series here.

And that’s all I can queue up at this point.  I still have more books planned outside of what you see here (including more Shieldclads, an anthology and possible sequels to Rink of War, some supplementary material for all of my series, and another sci-fi series dealing with a chubby pilot, his mind-reading girlfriend, and a space racing jalopy), and it’s possible one of those won’t let me go until I slip it in somewhere, but for the moment that’s as far as I have planned.

Edit:  Spammers are really going to town; I already have to shut down the comments on this one.

A Few Things to Tide You Over….

Things have just been too busy for my next “Ravencon Panels (I actually DID do)” to be ready even by next week, and I’m over a week late already, so I figured I’d post something a little less labour-intensive to tide any regular readers of this blog over.  I need a longer block of time for those series posts, but I can block out five or ten minutes of time here and there to work on the blog.  If I manage that, I bet I can cover a potpourri of topics that wind up being longer than my average blog series post.

I. To start with, I may have FINALLY found a cover artist for The Merrimack Event.  He gave me some homework to do, first (which has partly been why I’ve been too busy for the blog, lately), but that’s finally complete and things are moving forward. Getting him has been a bit of a coup, given his pedigree. I’m still waiting on some paperwork to be completed before I announce just who it is, however.

II.  I’ve been seeing a lot of odd writer’s or sci-fi\fantasy focused events, lately. Things like An Evening With Neil Gaiman at the Wolf Trap Theater (I was hoping to attend this, but as of when I’m typing this, it doesn’t look like I’ll make it), Dune: The Ballet (seriously? This really exists?), a comicon-style cosplay event at a local bar (which was last week, which is why I haven’t included a link; I missed it), and a Harry Potter for Night for Adults from our local library (we’ll see if I do that).  No real point here — just an observation.

III.  Something that nearly inspired another part in my Weird Research blog post series:  I saw an ad for a booklet, 10 B.S. Medical Tropes that Need to Die TODAY,  on Facebook.  It was free at the time (regularly $0.99), so I picked it up.  It was very informative, and quite useful for certain genre, but it didn’t address my main concern with medicine in stories:  Useful medical treatment in a fantasy setting.  So, if that’s what you’re looking for, I’ve been able to pull a lot of medical research from the following sources:

For medication, I found an easy-to-understand compilation of modern-science studies on the effectiveness of herbs, botanicals, and similar products thanks to the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

For surgery or other medical treatment… I suggest that you read the sports pages regularly.  Search through them long enough and you’ll find a lot of discussion of treatments, healing rates, and the long-term effects of various injuries, and it’s all in layman’s terms — you don’t need to learn too much jargon to figure it out.  Of course, if you want something more in-depth, I still note that when it comes to broken bones, separated shoulders, muscle tears, and (increasingly) concussions, it’s the field of sports medicine that is generating the most studies.

IV.  I rarely talk about my novelette, To the Rink of War.  It’s been a big disappointment for me — I originally intended for it to be a series of connected shorts (the first of which being the one I released) that would expand into a larger universe, which I would then start opening up for a multi-author shared-universe anthology.  I have Part I published, and in rough form I also have parts III and IV complete (in need of editing), with V mostly finished and II… well part II needed a complete re-write, but I figured I could get that done well before I was projecting its release.

But that, obviously, never happened.  The initial release of To the Rink of War was disappointing — I had no budget for a cover, and what I was able to cobble together without a budget was underwhelming; it was very short, but at the time of the release the lowest price I could set for it on Amazon ($0.99) was the most popular price point for much larger self-published novels (while that price point still exists, I’ve noticed fewer and fewer indie writers charging that low), so it was no bargain.  And it’s been a while since I published, but I seem to recall I managed to (unintentionally) time its release to the lowest-selling week of the year for me (and several other indie writers of my acquaintance).

The failure taught me several lessons, but I was saddened.  I was really invested in that world.  It had the development of a new sport, Microgravity Hockey.  It had interesting characters (and I do mean characters) like Emperor Norton II (yes, based on the guy I linked to), who may not be quite as crazy as he is letting you believe.  It had a mining asteroid colony setting (sort of like the popular Expanse series, but I like my stories a little less dreary than that).  On the other hand, it was kind of labor intensive to write, requiring me to do things like plot a course between asteroids using Celestia, and then using math in ways I haven’t since my high school days to figure out the actual travel times between the asteroids my characters were inhabiting.

The horrifically poor sales and math-heavy worldbuilding weren’t the only things working against its sequel.  My release schedule was utterly wrecked when first The Kitsune Stratagem was released late, and then The Merrimack Event’s initial “development hell” moment pushed back several of my other books (a small part of the long delay between In Treachery Forged and In Forgery Divided can be attributed to my attempts to get this… situation, if you will, resolved).  Re-writing Part II for a story with such horrifically anemic sales as the Rink of War had seemed like a waste of time better put into getting the rest of my books out there.  It worked fine as a stand-alone (it was initially conceived as such), so if I never got out part II it would be fine.

Lately, though, I’ve been giving thought to reviving the story, revamping Part I and re-tooling parts II-V so that I wound up with something more resembling a novel.  Still thinking of exactly how to do that, but depending how things go with The Merrimack Event’s eventual release (please, let me FINALLY get that thing out the door!) and the completion of In Division Imperiled (Book III of the Law of Swords series) I might be able to find time to look into that some more.  Though I also want to get By Claw and Arrow (the sequel to The Kitsune Stratagem) started, soon, so… we’ll see how things go.

V.  Speaking of In Division Imperiled, I’m thinking of returning its title to “In Division Deceived.”  Or maybe even changing that third word to something else altogether.  For those who weren’t here, or don’t remember the story, the Law of Swords series was conceived as a five book series.  In my efforts to better position my book for a Trad-Pub contract, I revised the outline to make it a four book series.  The title change was a result of the outline change, blending the title of book III and IV together.  Well, now that I’m self-publishing, I’m back to a 5-book outline.

But the outline has also changed significantly, as well, and the titles of the remaining books no longer fit the storylines explored as well as they had under the original outline.  At this point, the only thing I am certain of is that book three will have a three word title beginning with “In Division.”  I’ll see how the final word of the title fits once I’m done writing the darned thing.

VI.  My local library may or may not be hosting an event for local authors in October.  I may or may not be interested in attending, or even participating.  But the library is giving so little information about it (other than that it might be what they’re having this year as a substitute for Indie Author Day) that I have no idea what, exactly, the event is.  Or rather, they’re giving me the when, the where, the who, the how, but not the what or the why.  I may or may not revisit this topic once I know more.  You may or may not be interested.

VII.  I went from binge-watching the Guy Williams-led Zorro (1957) to binge-watching the Richard Greene-led Robin Hood (1955) to binge-watching the Raymond Burr-led Perry Mason (1957).  All of these shows were some I had seen before.  All of these shows were made well before I was born.  Somehow, however, I enjoy re-watching these shows a lot more than the bulk of my more modern favorites.  I don’t know if that’s from a subconscious bias towards the “classics,” or if the TV storytelling of the era just fits my interests more.  Something to ponder.

VIII. The point of a multi-author anthology like Worlds Enough: Fantastic Defenders is to introduce the existing audiences of each of the contributing writers to the works of all of the other writers.  I don’t know how successful that has been, so far.  On the other hand, it’s also the sort of thing that might have more long-term marketing effects.  Now, any time any of the writers in the anthology have a new release, that author’s new readers — exploring the writer’s other works — will see, and may purchase, the anthology… and be introduced to us other authors, as well.  It would help encourage those introductions, though, if the book had more reviews, so if any of my regular readers are willing to review that book it would be quite helpful.  (mentioning my story in the review would be nice, too)

IX.  I will need to update all of my Kindle eBooks, soon.  Apparently, something was changed in how Kindle interprets eBook files, so most of my scene separations are gone.  I’ll be introducing fleurons to restore those separations, so I’m open to making minor revisions in the files.  If anyone knows of or has found any typos in my books, lately, now is the time to let me know so I can make corrections.

X.  I may have mentioned this a few weeks ago, but I received an invite to be a guest at another convention (I haven’t announced which one, yet, and it feels like such an announcement deserves more prominent placement than as the tenth item of this slot).  I keep hoping for my name to appear on that convention’s website before saying anything, but it hasn’t yet.  It didn’t for the Ravencon convention I was a guest at earlier this year, either, until a couple months after I got the invite.  I guess this is a standard practice?

XI.  (written several days after topic VI, above, but not related to it) My local library had a “minicon” yesterday (Saturday).  It might have been an event that I would have been interested in, but I only found out about it after it was long over.  I keep myself tuned in to the library’s social media pages as much as is reasonable, but this isn’t the first time I’ve missed an event I might have serious interest in; in fact, I’d say it’s the tenth or eleventh… this year.  I wouldn’t even know about the October event from topic VI if I hadn’t queried them about Indie Author Day.  I’ve frequently found my library to be very supportive, but I really have to wonder what I need to do to be kept informed about their events.

XII.  As someone else said they had in the comments section of this article (which inspired this part of the post), I “broke my teeth” in writing with fanfiction.  I stopped posting fanfiction in 2005, but I didn’t entirely stop writing it.  I posted an update to one of my fanfics shortly after publishing my first book, trying to encourage my fanfic audience to seek my professional fiction, but that proved too ineffective to resume my fanfic career (even as a marketing gimmick for my professional fiction).

But I do have quite a bit of fanfiction stored… well, somewhere in my hard drive.  None of it is edited (not all that significant; my fanfiction rarely, if ever, got anything more than a spellcheck in the first place.  I was creating fanfics as a writing exercise, not as an editing exercise, and I never had enough constructive feedback to make effective revisions anyway).  Few, if any of them are finished.  But still, I probably have hundreds of thousands of words worth of various unposted fanfics just sitting there, gathering dust.

That article had me thinking back to those unfinished, long forgotten fanfics, and wondering if I should do something with them.  I considered “filing the serial numbers” off a few of them to try and make them publishable, but I believe my fanfics are too tightly wound into the original source for that to work.  It wouldn’t take much time for me to upload them to fanfiction.net and put them out there for people to read, but I have no intention of finishing any of them, and that might annoy people.

Still thinking about it all.

XIII.  Still undecided about what to do with my old convention calendar.  I thought writers and fans might find it a valuable resource, but it gets little traffic and almost no-one says anything about it.  It takes a great deal of effort to update and maintain, so if no-one’s using it there doesn’t seem to be any point.  Ah, well.

XIV.  And it’s time to post.  Hope you found something here to interest you….

In Forgery Divided, Two Months In

It’s been (very roughly) two months since In Forgery Divided‘s release, and I thought I would do a little comparison and contrast for the sales between it and it’s predecessor, In Treachery Forged.

First, a few differences in how the releases went:  When I released In Treachery Forged, it only took me one month to get the print book out.  Two months in and there still is no print edition for In Forgery Divided, and the biggest delay has been the cover.  (I just couldn’t bring myself to approve that cover.  I went back to my cover artist to see if he could help, and he’s sent me a “watered down” version that might not become quite so blacked out in print.  A new proof just arrived, and it actually looks like it’s supposed to.  I’ll have to make a quick check to make sure nothing odd has creeped into it since my last proof, but I should be approving it this week regardless).

The world has changed some; namely, taxes on eBooks in Europe have gone up significantly (they used to be a negligible sales tax; now they’re a 20% VAT tax)

Also, I attempted a few more new-release promotions, trying to get advertisements on Awesome Gang and another company (which I’m not linking to here; from what I can tell, they never showed my ad after agreeing to do so, negotiating a fee, and scheduling a date to show it.  They also never charged me, however, so I suppose it’s no harm, no foul).  I should also note I have twice as many Facebook followers, twenty more mailing list members, infinitely more twitter followers (I opened my twitter account for the first time a few months after In Treachery Forged’s release, so one person would be infinitely more), and… oh, yeah — this blog.

Some things remain the same.  The prices for both are identical at US$5.99, and I haven’t (for either book) run any price promotions; I will note that some portion of oversees books (mostly in Europe) will cost readers more because of the aforementioned changes in tax laws.  Both times, I submitted the cover to the Monthly Indie eBook Cover Design Awards (one difference:  For In Treachery Forged, I was able to submit the cover such that, by a fluke, it was shown by these awards during its first month of release.  For In Forgery Divided, however, it only showed up on the awards well into the second month after publication).  Both books have been given wide releases; I have never availed myself of Amazon’s KDP Select marketing program because of the exclusivity demands.

With that out of the way…

Two months in, with In Forgery Divided, I had sold a total of 1,505 eBooks (and a lone print book, but we can ignore that for now).  Or, rather, I sold 1548 eBooks and had 43 returns for a net of 1,505.  Most of them (1,406 of these net sales) were purchased on Amazon.com’s US store.  I also had 8 net sales on Amazon.uk (curiously, I had 4 returns, so 1/3 of my gross UK sales were returned at that point — by far the largest percentage at the time.  This trend did NOT continue, but at the time I was wondering if something odd was was going on), 20 net on Amazon.de (Germany), 2 from Amazon.fr (France), 4 net from Amazon.in (India), 1 from Amazon.bs (Brasil), 26 net from Amazon.ca (Canada), 27 net from Amazon.au (Australia), 7 from Nook (two of these sales are not technically part of the 1,505 figure even though they did occur in the first two months; the explanation for why is too long and involved for here), and 6 from Smashwords.  (I may have sold as many as 3 additional copies through Apple iBooks via Smashwords during this period; those weren’t credited to my account for another month, however, so I couldn’t count them here. I now go to Apple directly, thanks to my brother owning an Apple computer).

Most of those sales didn’t start until the book was in its second week of sales, but when it started selling it went right up the charts.  I do not have screencaps, but in 2014, I had a few weeks in the top-50 (topping, for one day, in the top-20) on several genre list bestsellers.  At the peak on those lists, I was getting 50-100 sales a day.

I will note that those 1,505 sales were roughly half of my sales of In Treachery Forged prior to publishing In Forgery Divided (which sparked a resurgence of sales in the former).  Another thousand (roughly) were sold over the next four months, and since then the sales dropped to a mere trickle, selling a mere 500 copies over the next year and a half.  So, what my experience with In Treachery Forged suggests is that the “New Release” burst of sales, even when successful, only lasts about six months (to a degree, I saw the same pattern with The Kitsune Stratagem, but that book never had the sales of In Treachery Forged).  Ideally, I’d have another book out before then… but it took over two years for Book 2 to come out.  (I’ll try to be faster with Book 3)

Unsurprisingly (given that not everyone who buys the first book of a series will buy its sequels… especially after a two year wait), sales for In Forgery Divided have not been as strong (on their own, anyway; as I said, it inspired a resurgence in sales of In Treachery Forged, which is making up much of the difference).  They’ve been pretty good, however, considering how long it took me to get book 2 out.

In Forgery Divided’s sales started strong, with its heaviest day of sales occuring just a week and a half after it was published.  The totals for the (roughly) first two months of sales are as follows:

Total Gross Sales:  702 (note: Amazon gives you three different ways of checking your sales; your ranking on the sale page, a graph on your sales dashboard, and a full accounting of your “month-to-date sales.”  These all report at different rates; I’m using the month-to-date sales for these records, because it’s the only one of these that also lets me know about returns… but it’s also the slowest one to report.  I think I have somewhere between 3-5 more gross sales that haven’t been accounted for in this record, yet)

Total Net Sales:  694 (only 8 returns, total?  That’s a real improvement over In Treachery Forged’s initial release)

Net Amazon.com (US) Sales:  603

Net Amazon.co.uk (UK) Sales:  31

Net Amazon.de (Germany) Sales:  18

Net Amazon.fr (France) Sales:  1

Net Amazon.ca (Canada) Sales:  8

Net Amazon.au (Australia) Sales:  27

Net Smashwords sales:  2

Net Nook Sales:  3

Net Apple iBooks Sales:  1

Far fewer returns, even accounting for the fewer sales.  I guess people who read book I are less likely to return book II.

UK sales are much stronger (the UK did, eventually, become the #2 purchaser of “In Treachery Forged,” but for some reason most of those sales didn’t start coming in until four months after its release), and there are even small improvements to sales in Australia and Germany.

It’s only in the US (both on Amazon and with the other vendors) where my initial sales are significantly weaker.  And much of that gap is being compensated for by sales boosts for my other books — over the past two months, the boost in sales to In Treachery Forged can account for approximately five hunded eBooks sold, and even my unrelated novel, The Kitsune Stratagem, has had another twenty or thirty sales generated by the new book release.

I’m not really sure what to make of these numbers, just yet, but as time goes on and I get more data ponts to go on, these numbers might start to mean something.

In the meantime, I’d better keep writing — I want to know what effect Book III will have on sales.

Jury Duty! (And Some News on the Print Edition)

I was scheduled for Jury Duty this last Thursday. I didn’t think much of it, as I’ve been summoned for Jury Duty five times in 12 years (You aren’t supposed to be scheduled less than 3 years apart, so somewhere along the line I was summoned when I wasn’t eligible) but never had to report in person — a phone call the night before has always been enough to “fulfill my commitment” before. But I had to, this week, and that  took away a couple days I needed for my planned blog post for this weekend.  I do have some news, however.

Despite the jury duty issue, I was able to get in some work on the Print Edition of In Forgery Divided.  I made a few more tweaks to further lighten the cover, and I discovered a small section in the book block that I must have accidentally skipped my first trip through (again, these are all purely book-design issues; they aren’t even typos — the only problems I’ve found this round were where the kerning needed some very slight adjustments).

I’m uploading the corrected files tonight, and if there aren’t any problems then I MIGHT decide to skip the “order a new proof” step and print it after all.  I don’t know — I was burned trying that once — but I can’t think of anything I’m changing which would cause any unexpected problems.  (Then again, if I could think of something, it wouldn’t exactly be an “unexpected” problem, would it?)

I have something close to 24 hours to decide (from past experience, it takes roughly that long for Createspace to approve any files).  If you’ve got an opinion on this, you’ve got about that long to tell me.

So, there’s that.  Meanwhile, the more interesting post I had planned involving research, a travelogue done by a Monty Python alum, and more will be coming out next weekend… barring some other crisis, at least.

The Print Proof Has Arrived… But I’m Not Happy

Okay, so the print proof for “In Forgery Divided” has arrived (as of last Friday), several days ahead of schedule. It’s a huge book, and will take me some time to go through it: While not a true proofread in the sense most people use the term, I do have to look at every page and every line (I don’t have to actually read anything; I need to look at the first letter of each line, the kerning (space between words), the margins, the fonts, the widows and orphans, etc., just to make sure everything looks nice and legible).  I figure I’ll still be just half-finished when I get to Ravencon next weekend.

So why, as I said in the title, am I not happy with this fast service?  Well, there’s a defect, and I’m worried it’s symptomatic of a quality control issue that may force me to make a decision I’d rather not.

I wanted a matte finish cover; both of my previous books have been matte finish, and I like the look of matte finish covers (especially for Fantasy novels).  It was a great boon for self-publishers when Createspace started giving a matte finish option.

However, my cover arrived with a defect; the matte cover finish had a bubble in the lamination, leading to a discolored bar traveling from the top to the bottom of the front of the cover.

Now, I could let Createspace know about the defect, and from what I understand they’ll replace the book free-of-charge (at least, that’s what their reputation says; I haven’t needed to contact their customer service before).  I don’t really think I need to, however — this is a completely disposable copy that I’ll be marking up, anyway, so no big deal.

Except… I’m now hearing that this lamination issue is becoming increasingly more common with Createspace’s matte finish covers.  That worries me; I don’t want my customers buying defective books.  I don’t want to be buying defective books, either, when it comes to purchasing review, consignment, and giveaway copies.

So, I may have to consider a glossy cover, instead.  I need to order at least one more proof before I put it on sale (I learned you should never assume the electronic proof, even for the “second” proof, is accurate, after the cover for “The Kitsune Stratagem” turned out to be misaligned by less than a quarter of an inch after I was finished with the first proof, even though I never did anything to the cover.  So, from now on, if I make changes I order another proof), so maybe I’ll change it to gloss and see what I think.

There may not be a blog next weekend.  I will be attending Ravencon (my application was too late to be considered as a guest, but it’s always a fun and educational convention, regardless), so I probably won’t have time to post anything.

Edit:  I accidentally hit “post” instead of “save draft” when I was working on this on Friday.  Oops.  If you’re the one person who my statistics plug-in says saw this early, that’s why the post vanished on you.

Odds and Ends

I had three possible posts I was getting ready for today, but none of them are ready. So, I figured I’d do a quicker blog covering some odds and ends…

I.  Print Edition Progress

The Print Edition of In Forgery Divided is compiled and a proof has been ordered.  There are certain design issues that cannot be checked or corrected until I’ve recieved my print proof (for example, I need to know what the cover looks like with a matte finish; from past experience, I know there can be contrast issues that don’t show on a computer screen).  It should arrive just in time to have it with me while attending Ravencon.  (Probably a good thing I applied too late to be a guest, there — I’m probably going to be going through the proof while I attend panels).

Of note, I am breaking my own pricing policy with this book.  In my Self-Publishing Roundtable series, I note that most physical bookstores won’t agree to carry your book unless you charge enough for them to make a profit — another writer\blogger calculated that if you (the writer\self-publisher) are earning a $2 royalty per sale in expanded distribution, the bookstore can earn a profit selling it.

However, to get that royalty amount, I would need to charge at least $20.80 (I used Amazon’s royalty calculator to narrow it to the nearest penny).  This is mostly because the book is that much bigger than my past books.  BUT… I’ve decided not to cross that $20 line; I’ve never seen traditional publishers charge more than that amount even for the most expensive of trade paperback books, so I won’t either.  Instead, I will keep it at the same cost as Book I, charging only $18.99 a copy.  I don’t exactly earn many royalties selling it at a price like this, but I’m still making a print edition made available for those of you who want one.  Just don’t complain about the price, please — I really can’t go much lower.

II.  Sales

In Forgery Divided had the strongest launch of any book I’ve released, at least in terms of day-one sales.  Sales have remained fairly steady (though there has been a surprisingly steep dive in sales so far, today).  Of course, a few good reviews can really help with that, so please review!

The most surprising thing, though, is that it really has lifted sales for my other books.  In Treachery Forged, book I of the series, hasn’t sold this well since May of 2014.

Even The Kitsune Stratagem (which has always disappointed me with its weak sales, even though I believe it’s my best written book to date) has posted more sales than it has since December 2014 (and may end the month even better).  I guess it proves the old adage correct — “Nothing sells Book I like Book II.”

The third bit of sales news is a peculiarity:  All of my sales have come through Amazon.  This is peculiar because it’s also available from Nook, iBooks, Kobo, Smashwords, etc.  In my past books, these stores haven’t been all that large of a percentage of my sales, but they were significant enough to be worth listing there.  So far, not a single sale on any of those has shown up.  I don’t know if this is because my past customers from those stores haven’t gotten the word, or if it’s because these ebook stores just aren’t selling anything, any more.  I’m strongly considering listing my next book with KDP-Select (the exclusive-to-Amazon program), just to test some of that program’s marketing tools I’ve sacrificed to keep my books available in wide release.

III.  Ravencon

As I mentioned earlier, I will be attending Ravencon from April 29th to May 1st.  As you might imagine, it’ll be a bit difficult for me to release a blog that weekend, but I’ll see if I can’t get something ready before I leave and set it to auto-release.  And, of course, I still should have a post for next week, as well.

IV.  Coming Plans

I’m not 100% sure which book, in my “to by written” list, will be next.  I hope to move straight into Book III of the Law of Swords series, but we’ll see.  I like the idea of it, but I was feeling a bit burnt out on things by the time I finished In Forgery Divided.

Hopefully enough time has gone by that I’ll be able to work on it again, but if I find myself staring at a blank page for weeks on end I’ll probably move to something else rather than just let my writing stagnate.  I also hope to eventually get The Merrimack Event out, but of course it still needs a round of editing and some cover art, as it has for over a year now.  My mother has offered to try her hand at the cover art (It sounds a bit lame to say “my mother made my cover art,” but she does have a resumé to suggest she can handle it.  She had collegiate training in artwork and design (had she not transferred to a different college to finish her degree, she would have earned a minor in it), and has continued her education in artwork all of her life.  Her career had included design for fashion in the past, and now uses her art background in her award-winning quilt designs.  I’m just not sure it all translates well to cover design), so we’ll see how that goes.

In the meantime, of course, I’ll be continuing this blog and working on… whatever I decide to work on.  See you all next week!

In Forgery Divided RELEASED!

Links are still coming in, but In Forgery Divided has been released through Amazon Kindle, Nook, Kobo, etc.!  Hurray!  (Please buy and review; reviews are extremely helpful)

I suppose, in a sense, this book made it by “deadline.”  It was uploaded on April 2nd (though the first live link didn’t appear until after midnight, so April 3rd).  In another sense, it’s well over a year overdue (I originally projected that I would have it out in January of 2015.  As I hadn’t even started writing by January of 2015, that was never going to happen).

Regardless, it’s out.  And I’m exhausted.  Tomorrow I’ll register the copyright (it IS protected under US copyright law, but until I register I can’t take legal action, and you must file within 30 days (or maybe it’s 60 days?  Something like that) for the full protection, but you aren’t supposed to file until after you’ve published.  Yeah, it’s stupid, but the Copyright Office is a bureaucracy, so what do you expect?), then start myself on the print edition.

Some Statistics:

This is my largest book, to day, running at over 165,000 words by Microsoft Word count.  While I don’t have an exact page count, yet, the print version will probably top four hundred pages long.

Writing the book took almost nine months.  My editor took four months for his pass.  My own review of his edits (which also was a self-editing second pass of edits) took three months.

Fun news:  The book somehow sold three copies on Amazon before I was able to find a live link.  Two of those sales, oddly enough, were in the U.K.  (I’m not certain it’s hit Amazon.au or Amazon.ca yet; those are #s 3 and 4, resepectively, for the sales of my other books).  The book went live first on Amazon, then on Kobo, then on Smashwords.  In fact, it’s gone live on Inktera — which is a little remarkable, as you have to go through a 3rd party (in this case, Draft2Digital) to get to them.  As of when I’m first typing this, it still hasn’t gone live on Nook — they’re the slowpokes, this go around.

Links for sale will be edited in below as I find they’ve gone live, or you can go to the Fennec Fox Press website (where I’ll also be posting links as they go live).

Purchase from:

Amazon

Smashwords

Nook (eventually, a day after everyone else)

Kobo

Apple iBooks

Inktera

DriveThruFiction

24Symbols

 

So, I’m Cleaning Up My Edits…

As I’ve mentioned the past couple of weeks, I’ve been cleaning up the edits for “In Forgery Divided” in preparation for its release (I’m still waiting on the cover art, as well. I was promised a copy of the pending-final-approval finished product “in a week” last Monday. Still 29 hours to go…). I’ve noticed a few things that should be mentioned (and those of you who follow me on Facebook might have seen a couple of these points before):

1. I’ve frequently heard “Your book will shrink by 20-30% as it’s edited.” When I edited book one (In Treachery Forged), this was largely true, but it hasn’t been true since. “The Kitsune Stratagem” increased in size, starting at just over 140,000 words and ending almost exactly 10,000 words larger. So far, about five chapters in, “In Forgery Divided” is keeping pretty darn close to the same number of words as it was in the first draft (despite a number of changes, the cuts and the additions seem to have balanced each other out). (I wish I could say what “The Merrimack Event” was doing, but I have yet to decide on an editor for it. In pre-editor self-edits, however, I did cut out about 30,000 words).

2. I’ve frequently heard “Those parts you struggled with the most when writing will be the best parts; the ones you thought were easy will wind up needing the most edits.” Again, this just hasn’t matched up with my experience. Through everything I’ve written, the things that I’ve had the easiest time with have had the fewest editorial comments (save some proofreading issues largely caused by my mild dyslexia; that doesn’t seem effected by the difficulty of the writing at all). The things I’ve struggled with the most in writing have had the most editorial comments. That pattern is (SO FAR) matching my experience with “In Forgery Divided” as well.

3. I didn’t really think of it as editing, but as I clean up the edits I recieve I’m doing a lot of editing myself. I’d say I’m more of a second-pass self-editor at this stage. I don’t just make the corrections my paid for (or bartered for, in this case) editor suggest; I read every word (well, more or less) and do my own editorial work. I don’t know if I do more edits than the paid for editor or not, but I do a lot of them.

4. I hate missing opportunities, but that can happen in the middle of a big project like this. When I was working to get “In Treachery Forged” released, I missed out on an opportunity to be part of a cross-promotional anthology because I was too busy. This time, an opportunity came up to volunteer as a beta reader for a bigger-named author — something which can really help a guy in the professional networking department. Unfortunately, I’m deep into the edits, and didn’t have time. I almost volunteered anyway, but by the time I figured out how I could handle it the author was full up.

5. Lots of people enjoy snow because it gives them time off. When you’re writing or editing, you get no time off; you lose time. You still have to work and you ALSO have to tire yourself (or injure yourself; pulled a muscle in my shovel arm) out shovelling on the same day. A blizzard can really kill your momentum.

I’m sure I’ll have more observations at some point. I may even get them into blog form, some day… but my blogs will continue to be a bit sparse until I finally get the book out.

Back-of-the-Book Blurb POLL! The Merrimack Event

(I had three unfinished blogs in progress this morning, and plans for at least three others, but nothing finished.   I’m not sure which of the other posts from that set I’ll finish for next Sunday’s blog, but I have options.  I keep hoping I’ll have more news on the progress I’ve made toward publishing my books for you guys, but I’ve heard nothing from any editors or cover artists this past week).

So, it took several weeks, but I did finally get enough votes (with enough of a vote differential) to come to a conclusion about the “In Forgery Divided” blurbs.  In THAT poll, I think Blurb B wins out, but the difference I’m going to consider making a few tweaks to it.

But now it’s time to get some interest in “The Merrimack Event,” so let’s try the same type of “Back of the book blurb poll” for that one! Pick whichever you like.  And feel free to comment if you want to.  (Please?)

(Edited to make the poll work.  I forgot to test it before posting, and goofed up somewhere.  Sorry about that!)

BLURB OPTION A:

While the Earth Alliance Naval Academy is having a once-every-four-years wargame on a distant frontier colony, a surprise attack from a foreign star wipes out most of the Navy.  A daring plan to respond is made using a fleet of recently mothballed ships crewed by Academy students.  These ships are old and out of date, and their crews are half-trained and inexperienced, but they do have one advantage:  One enterprising young engineer has figured out how to combine the old technology of his century-old corvette and the now-standard modern engines to produce the first of the Shieldclads.

BLURB OPTION B:

Freshman Cadet Lieutenant Chris Desaix entered the Earth Alliance Naval Academy merely looking to round out a promising education in Engineering, but after he wins a campus-wide tactical competition his instructors start trying to convince him to change his major.  But when the Earth Alliance Navy is devastated by a surprise attack, he must use both talents to help them strike back.

Edit:  The polling plug-in appears to be malfunctioning somehow (it seems to automatically close after about fifteen minutes, even though it claims it’s open and is set to never close).  Sigh.  And now spammers are hitting the comments hard.  Since those comments require my approval, you aren’t seeing them, but they’re coming in numbers great enough I’m disabling comments.  Contact me if you want me to re-enable them.

Bugfix: Which blurb do you prefer

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...

Status Report

With Thanksgiving (and a lot of chores), I didn’t quite finish everything I intended for the blog post I had planned for this week (the “Merrimack Event”‘s back-of-the-book blurb). In its place, I figured I would do a status report for all the things I’ve told you I was going to be doing.

First of all, I’ve applied to be a guest at a few conventions. I haven’t heard back from any of them, yet, but I haven’t been rejected yet, either. I’m hopeful.

In Forgery Divided is still with the editor and cover artist. I haven’t recieved any information from my cover artist recently, but my editor says he’s through most of it, but there were a couple “problem areas” he’s devoting more attention to. I’m as tired of these delays as I’m sure my readers are, but I can’t put it out without a cover or any editing.

Over the last week, I’ve started approaching some more potential cover artists to get estimates for “The Merrimack Event.” Haven’t heard back from any of them, yet, but that’s no surprise in this timeframe. I’ve identified four editors to try and vet, but I have yet to approach any of them.

The Back-of-the-Book Blurb for “The Merrimack Event” should be posted next week, but I’ve got new ideas going from there. I’ve been cleaning out my office desk as I prepare to move my new computer from it’s temporary set-up to its permanent home. Found some fun things I could take pictures of (maybe. I hate taking pictures of any kind) and talk about here on the blog, including badges for well over a dozen conventions I’ve attended in the past — all from 2009 or earlier. And I’ve started a fun little research project I may discuss here, as well, even though it’s research for a story I probably won’t be writing for years.

A belated Happy Thanksgiving. And I’m giving you guys even more thanks for reading this blog. (I might be even more thankful if a few of you commented now and then when I was asking you guys for comments, but I’ll take what I can get).