This Book Cannot Make Any Money — Getting Started: Content

In the first part of this series, I set up my computer with a bunch of free software for the production of a book without any budget. Today, I deal with the book’s content.

Now, if you’ve been following this blog long enough to remember the original post on this concept, you’ll recall that I planned the publication of “This Book Cannot Make Any Money” as a sort of tutorial (or, rather, to borrow a term from the Youtube gaming industry, a sort of “Let’s Play“) for self-publishing a book.

But I have more than one reason for pursuing this blog series:  I want something I can use to test out the KDP Print service, and I don’t want to use one of my more substantive books.  I need something new, something unconnected with my larger series, but I don’t have time to write an entirely new novel.

I do have time, however, to compile a bunch of material from my past writing can’t be used elsewhere. Things like poetry (much of it written in high school), a short story (nearly a short-short) that doesn’t fit with anything else I’ve ever written, fragments of other stories which I’ve rejected, myself, for one reason or another, etc.  Maybe even a few of my past (or future!) blog entries to add a little more to it.  Anything I can find, from my old material, that wouldn’t be a COMPLETE embarrassment to publish (though some of those bits of high school poetry are pushing it).

And many of them have one thing in common:  Someone (and in some cases, it was me), somewhere along the way, said these bits and pieces can’t make any money.

So why am I bothering with a blog on this book’s content, if the content is already taken care of?  Well, there’s more than one thing to mention, here.  For one, once you’re done writing your book, even before editing it, you need to evaluate the content and judge whether you’ve done a good enough job to actually publish your work.

Writers have a reputation for being neurotic.  No wonder!  We have to be egotistical enough to believe that our writing will interest others while still being humble enough to allow constructive criticism.  A lot of would-be professional writers lack the confidence to believe that what they’re writing is worth publishing, and so never get published.  A lot of writers grow an ego so large that they never accept criticism, and therefore produce low-quality work.  That sort of dichotomy is a veritable breeding ground for Imposter Syndrome.

When you’re self-publishing, it can get even worse.  You need to believe that your writing is good enough to sell, but you need to keep your ego in check enough to maintain quality control.  Now, I have occasionally had quality control issues (as all of the reviews for The Merrimack Event warning about my “then-than” issue might suggest; I’m working on that, people, but so far I’ve only found five.  From the reviews, I would think I had a lot more than that, so I’m still looking for more before uploading a revised version.  If you could point specific instances out for me instead of just spouting that I have “lots” of then-than errors for the hundredth time, I’d be grateful), but mostly of the mild and technical variety.

That sort of error should be found and cleaned up, preferably (sigh) before publication, but that’s not a substantive issue that would prevent the work from being published.  What you need to look for is:

  1.  Do you have a proper beginning, middle, and end?
  2.  Do you have enough story and character development to support the plot?
  3.  Do you have enough conflict to create dramatic tension?  (This is needed EVEN IN COMEDY, if you are producing comedy-with-plot)
  4.  Is your plot premised on bad research?  If so, are your readers likely to call you out on that?
  5.  Opposite problem:  Have you added so much conflict that your plot is becoming convoluted?  Must your characters rely solely on luck to succeed?

If you’re capable of giving truthful answers to the above questions, you can evaluate your own work to determine whether it’s acceptable for publication.  (If you can’t, you need to find someone who can to read your manuscripts for you)

All of these problems can be fixed; the question becomes how much time will it take to fix them.  If you figure you’ve got the time to fix it, go ahead and FIX the darned thing and then publish it.  If you figure the amount of time needed to fix it is more than its worth, you need to be able to reject your own work.

Much of the (non-poetic) material intended for “This Book Cannot Make Any Money” comes from my older work that I rejected for one or more of the reasons, above.  Which doesn’t meant the writing is horrible; just that it would take me far too long to revise the whole manuscript into something I could publish.

What I’m going to do is add the parts of each manuscript which aren’t going to require too much time to fix up, leaving the rest behind.

But, as I said, I had something else to cover in the content portion of this blog series:  Not all of the content has been compiled, yet.  There’s still more that has to be written.

Even with a collection of previously written material like this, I still need to add enough structure to turn it from a loose collection of random writings into, well, an actual book.  Some of the material is handwritten, and needs to be typed up.  Some of it will need to be cut and trimmed down to just the acceptable portions.

But to start with, I need to make the content fit into some sort of structure; that turns it from a random collection of my outtakes into an actual book.  That may include writing some (small) bits of content to make things fit.

For example, I’m going to need to split the poetry into three sections.  It naturally fits into two — High School poetry, and haiku.  So, reluctantly, I’m going to spend some of what is normally my blog-writing time over the next few weeks writing poetry.  Bleh.  Maybe I can make it something silly, like limericks.  If I can come up with limericks connected to my existing writing, that might even be fun.

Of course, that’s not all of the “extra” writing I need to do.  It may only be a couple paragraphs here or there, but I still need to write introductory pieces for each section.  And an introduction to the book itself, which may be lengthier.  And, well, there’s one other thing that I know hasn’t been written, yet (but we’ll cover that later).

So, even though the bulk of the content of “This Book Cannot Make Any Money” is already complete, I still need to fire up that LibreOffice suite I installed last week and get to typing.  Fortunately that’s pretty straightforward — no-one here needs me to demonstrate typing, do they?  (I’ll note that I would be a terrible typing tutor; while I don’t quite use a “hunt-and-peck” style of typing, I never learned touch typing, either.  My method works for me, but that’s after more than thirty years of experience in typing “wrong.”).  The only note I think needs to be made here, for those following along at home, is that I recommend saving any files created under the old .doc extension (often called the Word 97-2003 format); I’ve found it to be more universally compatible than the newer .docx format.  I’ve encountered the weirdest glitches when trying to work with a document copied and pasted from a .docx file.

Another thing:  A lot of self-published writers recommend using Microsoft Office’s styles extensively.  I can see why — much of the software designed to automatically convert your eBook from .doc (or .docx) to .epub uses elements from those styles to determine things like chapter separations and the like.  Since I’ll be building the .epub file manually, however, I won’t bother with that.  I stick to the default style and worry about formatting the book later.

There should be at least one more piece of content I need to write that hasn’t been mentioned yet, however:  I need something unedited to use as material for a before-and-after type demonstration for a future “This Book Cannot Make Any Money” post:  The Editing process.

So, next week should be… well, whatever I come up with for that unedited material (I’m still not sure what that’s going to be; it should be short, however —  a thousand words or so, at most).  Then we’ll talk about editing your work without having the budget to hire an editor.

As a note, I am hoping to have something to announce in the next few weeks (possibly, though not likely, as early as next weekend).  If I do make that announcement, I’ll be bumping that week’s blog forward a bit.  Again, this PROBABLY won’t bump next weekends blog, but I figured I’d mention the possibility in case it did.

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